Free Webinar on Managing Fibromyalgia Symptoms

about sue

Susan Ingebretson, a fibromyalgia patient, author of the best-selling book FibroWHYalgia & contributor to our own Living Well with Fibromyalgia, will host a free webinar, to share her story about her path to improving fibromyalgia symptoms.

Strategies for Reducing Symptoms with Sue Ingebretson will take place at 1 pm EST on November 29. 

Ingebretson, like many of us, found it impossible to maintain an adequate quality of life with fibromyalgia. So, she set out to research ways of making an holistic and significant improvement in her life. Eventually, she ended up writing a book about what she had always looked for to manage her own condition.

In the webinar, Ingebretson will tell her story, review natural treatments, explain what is currently lacking in most patients’ attempts at recovery; and, present a work plan called “restoration trio,”  a practical and realistic work plan to maintain a lifestyle that can improve fibromyalgia symptoms over time.

We already know that non-pharmacologic therapies and lifestyle changes have shown that a multi-disciplinary approach offers better healthcare outcomes, and that patient engagement in the care process is essential.

Nonetheless, physicians often rely on traditional medical practices to treat the condition and do not always seek the patient’s feedback, says Ingebretson.

Ingebretson worked to identify lifestyle changes that could help in the healing process of a chronically ill body and mind from a perspective that most professionals do not necessarily have.

A copy of FibroWHYalgia will be raffled off among participants in the webinar.

Ingebretson is a certified holistic healthcare practitioner and program director of the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Center at California State University. She also has a blog, where news and topics promoting positive lifestyle changes and healthy living are discussed.

For more details about the webinar, please contact Adi Bein at: adi.bein@genefo.com

Beating Fibromyalgia?

I was directed to a link to a documentary by producers Living Whole Body Health and Dr. Tim Weeks called Beating Fibromyalgia

This documentary focuses on the life of Prasad Moss, a 37 years old man who has suffered from Fibromyalgia for over 20 years causing him great pain and disabilities. This 61 minutes long documentary shows Dr. Tim Weeks and Prasad Moss take up a 21-day intensive natural healing protocol to help Prasad find relief from his pain and fatigue, and after the 21 days Prasad becomes pain-free.

This film is available on Amazon Prime Video and can be viewed for free by Amazon Prime Members. It can also be rented for as low as $0.99 for those who don’t have an Amazon Prime membership. (This is NOT me advertising or endorsing this film as) it seems that it cannot be viewed in my area (Melbourne, Australia) so I can’t review it.

I’d love to hear some of your (objective) opinions below.

 

MCS in FMS & ME/CFS

This post contains affiliate links. I may be rewarded financially for any purchases you might make.

Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), also known as idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI), is common in people with fibromyalgia. Some researchers believe they are all part of a family of illnesses, which some have called “functional somatic syndromes” or “environmental illness.” A term now gaining prominence is “central sensitivity syndromes.”
In central sensitivity syndromes, the central nervous system becomes hyper-responsive to certain stimuli. Those stimuli can include pain, temperature, light, and, especially in the case of MCS, chemicals.

Someone with MCS has negative reactions to even small amounts of chemical substances in their environment. While chemicals can make just about anyone sick if they’re at high-enough levels, in MCS, even low amounts lead to symptoms.

Common problem substances include:

  • Fragrances, such as in cleaning products, perfumes, candles, and hygiene products,
  • Cigarette smoke,
  • Paint fumes,
  • Gasoline fumes,
  • Industrial chemicals,
  • Medications,
  • Chemicals in tap water; and
  • Chemicals and dyes in clothing.

Some of these things trigger symptoms with their smells or upon physical contact, while others must be ingested. Not everyone with MCS is sensitive to the same things: one person may be unable to be in the room with someone smoking or wearing scented lotion, but be fine at the gas station; meanwhile, someone else can handle hygiene-product fragrances but gets sick around pesticides and cleaning products.

Someone else may have problems with all of those things.

Fuzzy Logic USA sell pure (no chemical dyes or treatment) organic clothing and accessories. NOT all organic products are created equal. Many use organic materials then go on to use harsh chemicals and colorants to make them look pretty. Unfortunately, people with fibro and other skin sensitivities can suffer from allergic reactions.

Check out the entire range of Organic Cotton Colours clothing
Fuzzy Logic USA

The urban lifestyle and the many chemicals and electromagnetic fields to which we are subjected daily have grown, exponentially.

Currently, there are millions of affected peoples with different pathologies triggered to chemical smells, people that feel discomfort when they use certain clothing or are close to low frequency electromagnetic fields. MCS has been recognized for a couple of decades, but it’s still a fairly controversial diagnosis. It’s also an illness that’s gone through multiple names. Along with environmental illness, it’s been called chemical injury or chemical sensitivity.

It is known that there is a direct relationship between fibro, MCS and electrosensitivity (extreme sensitivity to magnetic fields). Organic Cotton Colours have become aware, through the direct testimony of people affected, of the use of their products as a palliative measure. The absolute lack of chemicals in their clothes during the entire process, the refusal to use dyes and the extreme care in the making, have become an instrument facilitating the daily life of a increasingly high percentage of the population.

It’s 25 years of experience and dedication to customers, hundreds of testimonies from concerned associations, naturalists, clinics. Organic Cotton Colours wants to serve as a support platform for a more sustainable lifestyle, healthy and natural.

Fuzzy Logic USA

We don’t have any drugs or medical treatments for MCS in general. However, some people may have success with treatments aimed at specific sensitivities.

The primary way to manage MCS is to avoid the things that make you sick. Fuzzy Logic USA is providing a way for you to avoid chemicals and dyes.

Poke those Heart Disease Perils

From the Healthcare Medical Institute:

Acupuncture Reduces Heart Disease Risk

Researchers have concluded that acupuncture reduces the risk of coronary heart disease in patients who have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia. A massive sample size of over 158 420 patients with fibromyalgia were included in the study. A total of 81 843 patients received acupuncture treatments and 76 582 patients never received acupuncture. A total of 12 522 patients developed coronary heart disease during the follow-up period. 4 389 patients receiving acupuncture developed coronary heart disease but 8 133 patients, that did not receive acupuncture, developed coronary heart disease. The researchers conclude that acupuncture “significantly decreased the risk of CHD [coronary heart disease] in patients with fibromyalgia with or without comorbidities.

203. acupuncture

Acupuncture decreased the risk of coronary heart disease equally for both men and women. The risk of coronary heart disease increased with the age of patients; however, acupuncture decreased risks across all age groups. In addition, acupuncture decreased the risk of coronary heart disease regardless of whether or not patients took steroid medications, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), or statins.

Patients receiving acupuncture averaged a total of 7.45 acupuncture sessions. A total of 85% of patients received manual acupuncture, 3.6% received electroacupuncture, and 10.7% received both manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture treatments. The duration of needle retention time averaged between 20 – 30 minutes per acupuncture session. The elicitation of deqi was a basic requirement by the TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) doctors.

Most TCM doctors applying acupuncture in the study had a baccalaureate degree from a 7 – 8 year medical doctor program of study. A smaller number of TCM doctors had a post-baccalaureate TCM degree from a 5 year medical doctor program. Acupuncture point selection was individualized based upon differential diagnostics. Importantly, this differs from the majority of research where there is a protocolized, fixed set of acupuncture points assigned to all patients.

The researchers note that prior independent investigations demonstrate that acupuncture is effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia. This study did not investigate clinical efficacy towards alleviation of fibromyalgia itself, but rather investigated whether or not acupuncture prevents coronary heart disease in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia. The researchers conclude that “the incidence of CHD was significantly lower in the acupuncture cohort than in the no-acupuncture cohort.”

The researchers cite this interest in acupuncture’s ability to protect the heart from damage because pregabalin was the first FDA approved medication for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Pregabalin has been proven to reduce pain, improve sleep, and reduce fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia. The researchers note that “pregabalin has cardiac adverse effects because it may induce heart failure” and acupuncture attenuates “both ischemic injury of the heart and heart failure.” Based on these findings, the researchers recommend a study to determine if acupuncture ameliorates the adverse effects of pregabalin in an effort to reduce risks associated with drug therapy.

The researchers note that the prevention of coronary heart disease may be due to acupuncture’s ability to improve sleep quality. The research team cited prior research demonstrating acupuncture’s ability to alleviate insomnia. They add that insomnia is “highly associated with fibromyalgia and CHD.”

Common fibromyalgia comorbidities (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, heart disease) are associated with elevated levels of systemic inflammation. The researchers note that the prevention of coronary heart disease may be due to acupuncture’s ability to reduce inflammation. The researchers note, “Many previous studies of acupuncture were focused on the analgesic effect of acupuncture, but additional studies in recent years demonstrated that acupuncture attenuated inflammation. Acupuncture attenuated inflammation through the vagus nerve mediated by dopamine.”Untitled

#Fibromyalgia, Fatigue and some (naughty) Fun

I know that some of you cannot even think of having sex without bringing on a flare – Me? I’d put up with a flare at the moment for a little loving!

With Valentine’s Day approaching, imagine this:

It’s 9pm. You’ve just put the kids to bed. It’s been a long, exhausting day. It feels like 4 in the morning and you’re ready to fall over. Suddenly your other half looks at you in that way, smiles and strokes your arm, and you know he/she wants to ‘make lurve.’

So, what’s your reaction?

Decreased sexual interest is not considered a common characteristic of FM. Nonetheless, a 2005 Turkish study demonstrates that female patients with FM have distinct sexual dysfunction compared with healthy controls.292.FM Lovesong

What is Normal Sexual Function?

For women, sex is a complex issue because it involves both physical and emotional reactions. Normal sexual functioning, however, may be divided into specific stages that include:

  • Desire
  • Arousal
  • Orgasm
  • Relaxation

They are all tied together with feelings of fulfillment, satisfaction and pleasure. For a woman, this is achieved not simply through physical touching. It involves psychological and emotional engagement. It may be difficult at times to remain sexually engaged when your body is in pain or fatigued or you are experiencing low self-esteem.

Types of Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Fibromyalgia

Sexual dysfunction refers to the inability to either engage in or enjoy the sexual act. It occurs for a number of different reasons that include illness, the impact of medications on the body, or emotional distress.

Women with fibromyalgia may suffer from one or more types of sexual dysfunction. The more common types include:

  1. Decreased sexual desire or drive
  2. Less arousal but maybe adequate sex drive
  3. Difficulty in achieving orgasm
  4. Increased pain with sexual intercourse or vaginal contact
  5. Failure of the body to co-operate with the desired position or movement

I am not even pretending that I know how to help with the first three types. I feel I can offer some suggestion on the last two.

We already know that FM is more foe than friend.  While many of us are too tired for sex, it is the muscle pain that leads to pressure and a squeezing of the pelvic area and lower back that ultimately result in muscle cramping during sexual intercourse. This naturally causes a great deal of discomfort, making it difficult to engage in certain sexual behaviours.

Sex may eventually become something that is no longer pleasurable (I can’t believe I said that!), but a negative experience. One’s natural tendency is to avoid such physically intimate situations, especially given that one is too tired or sore for sex.

sexSo, who can be bothered? (Pick me! Pick me!)

Further, taking a toll on one’s sex life are FM medications that decrease libido and a man’s ability to attain or maintain erection. Anti-depressants can also take a toll on a person’s sexual functioning. A person living with FM may react negatively to bodily changes, like weight changes and the loss of muscle mass.

As lovers feel less connected in the boudoir, their sexual relationship takes a hit (ie: unless you take steps to stay mentally and spiritually connected while attempting to be physically intimate). It’s important to realise that the release of hormones and endorphins, natural opioids, during sex can help to relieve FM symptoms, like pain and depression, and boost well-being. This double-sided sword is that while sex can relieve symptoms of FM, FM itself may result in a decreased libido, and, definitely, fatigue and pain that hinder a person’s desire and ability to engage in sexual intercourse.

Maintaining your sex life is vital to your health and well-being. Consider adopting this plan on Tuesday:

  • Plan ahead to make this the night for sexual relations. Practice acceptance. Adapt. Make peace with the fact that you need to deal with this condition, and then allow yourself to reclaim your life in every way. This means ensuring you do not wear yourself out earlier during the day. You need to be well-rested so pace yourself.
  • If you have stiffness of your muscles or joints, consider ways to reduce the stiffness. Do some stretching to relax the muscles and make them limber.
  • Practice reducing stress. You can do breathing exercises. You can also combine exercise with stress reduction by playing soothing music while you do yoga. For some, a guided meditation or visualization will produce the desired result.
  • Take a warm bath or shower. A bath is excellent because it means you can pamper yourself. Play soft, romantic or sensual music and indulge in an sumptuous bubble bath
  • Prepare the room so it is relaxing, comfortable and reignites your passion. Clean, fresh, fragrant sheets can help. Pillows you can place to make positions easier are good tools to have handy. Soft lights and even softer music can also be effective in setting the right mood.
  • When it comes to the actual sex act, talk to your partner. Consider some positions that do not cause any discomfort but result in pleasure for both of you. Allow your partner to be more active during sex if possible (Absolutely nothing bad about THAT!) Talk it through.
  • Experiment with different sexual positions. There are plenty of activities and positions that are ideal for fatigue; and many ways to avoid painful sex. And have fun trying them ALL out! (see the attachment)
  • Enjoy each other despite flare ups. Part of this is not being so goal-oriented during a love-making session. Allow things to happen as they can.
  • Stay physically connected by just cuddling (unless such is not made possible by allondynia, where the brain misinterprets neutral or pleasant stimuli for pain).

The important thing is to learn what has produced your sexual dysfunction and to make an effort to maintain interest in sex. You can discuss any concerns you have with your doctor and your partner or spouse. Being honest with your intimate partner will help you maintain an active sex life.

Finally?

Don’t give up. It might feel like you’re never going to want to have sex ever again – but that’s the fibro talking, not you. Lust strikes at the oddest moment, and people can have sex in a myriad of ways. So have fun exploring what works best for you. and you’ll feel IT again.

And when you do, take advantage of it, and enjoy it!

lrg_Ornamental_Divider__Englische_Linie

For those grown-ups among us (and those NOT easily offended), please check out these recommended sexual positions that require less physical exertion. This is adult content –  By clicking “I Agree” below, you are agreeing to the following:

  1. You are an adult, at least 18 years of age, you are familiar with and understand the standards and laws of your local community regarding sexually oriented media. You represent that, based on your familiarity with the standards and laws of your local community, you will not be violating any applicable standards or laws by requesting, receiving, downloading or possessing any of the video, audio, graphics, images or text (“Adult Material”) available on this Website.
  2. You hereby acknowledge that any use of this Website is at your sole risk. You understand that by accepting the terms of this Agreement, you are agreeing to hold the Publisher of this Web Site harmless from any responsibilities or liabilities related to your use of this Web Site and the Adult Material contained herein.
  3. You will not permit any person(s) under 18 years of age to have access to any of the Adult Materials contained in this Web Site.
  4. You are voluntarily choosing to access this Web Site, because you want to view, read or hear the various Adult Materials that are available. You agree to immediately exit from this Web Site if you are in any way offended by the sexual nature of any Adult Material.
  5. If you use this Web Site in violation of these Terms, or use this Web Site where such use is illegal, you may be in violation of local and/or federal laws. You agree that you are solely responsible for your use of this Web Site and agree to indemnify Publisher against any claims arising out of such use.

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Fear Factor

I was reading an article from The Mighty about guilt and chronic illness. You know what I mean…that niggling feeling you have about being sick. No, I’m not going to write about guilt, too (I’ve looked at those thoughts previously, here and here): I’m writing about fear.

Firstly, you need to know a little about my background, so the abridged version:

  • I was 40 before I heard about fibromyalgia.
  • Previously, I had worked in hotels, on cruise ships and in casinos.
  • At 34yo, I started a Bachelor of Laws while working, at the casino, full-time.
  • I was able to ‘practice’ law for one whole month before the debilitating purple wave took over my life – FIBROMYALGIA!

I have just celebrated the 25th anniversary of my 21st birthday (yes, I’m 46 now) and, as my ankle and leg get better, I feel like I have a little more control (understanding?) over my illness.

119-fibro-fogSo, what am I going to do?

I have been sick (and not working) for 72 times longer than I was actually practicing law. I can truly say that I have forgotten more law than most of you will ever know (you know what I mean!) but I am scared $#!%less – anyone else feel the same? How are you dealing with it?

 

I Have the Antidote!

daffyToday, 85% of patients don’t know about clinical trials. If they do, it’s very difficult to find the right trials because the information that’s available is complicated and confusing. And this means that 80% of clinical trials are delayed or closed due to difficulty finding patients to take part. Medical progress is slowed, and patients continue to wait for answers.

antidote

Antidote is leading a collaborative effort to speed up the development of breakthrough treatments and potential cures by making medical research accessible and transparent to all.

What this means is they’re making it easier for researchers to provide patients with information on their studies through Antidote Bridge, and they’re making it simple for patients to find easy-to-understand information on studies that are right for them through Antidote Match. Then, through Connect Network, the first online network of patient organizations, online health portals, and advocacy groups, they’re making sure that all patients know about opportunities to take part in medical research.

By facilitating this flow of information and making these connections, Antidote can accelerate medical research. This is an urgent and bold mission to improve the health of everyone, everywhere – but we can’t do it alone.

It’s Legal to Grow Cannabis in Australia!*

mj-fmgirlOh, so much excitement about medicinal cannabis in our fibromyalgia family!

BUT do you know what’s happening here (ie: Australia)?

It is legal to cultivate and manufacture medicinal cannabis in Australia (Hold On! Keep reading!), which means people can apply for a licence to grow their own cannabis crop from the Office of Drug Control.

Since early November, through the Therapeutic Goods Administration, medicinal cannabis no longer falls under Australia’s most stringent of schedules, reserved for dangerous drugs. Instead, there are provisions in place to use it on medical grounds, with certain approvals but only for very ill people.

However, it will still be illegal to use or grow marijuana for recreational purposes.

It is up to the states to decide whether the drug will be allowed and who will be able to use it, dispense it, who will be able to approve it, and what dosage and form of medicinal cannabis is appropriate. And this is where things get murky (da,da, da, dum…)! Each state is trying to form or introduce its own legislation, while also considering the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961.

single-convention

The convention is set in place by the United Nations, and outlines how medicinal cannabis should be approached.

So, how does it work state by state?

  • If you are in Queensland, from March 2017 a specialist should be able to prescribe medicinal cannabis for certain patients who have illnesses including MS, epilepsy, cancer and HIV/AIDS. There are no age restrictions, but approval will only be provided by a doctor who needs to show evidence that medicinal cannabis could help the patient.
  • In New South Wales, medicinal cannabis will be available for end of life illnesses, but only for adults.
  • In Victoria, children with severe epilepsy will be able to access medicinal cannabis from early 2017.
  • The ACT is currently working on legislation that will include education sources for doctors. The legislation is expected to come into effect next year .
  • Tasmania is developing a Controlled Access Scheme, to allow patients to access unregistered medical cannabis. It is expected to come into effect next year.
  • The WA Government has recently passed changes supporting the federal legislation. That means that doctors are able to prescribe medicinal cannabis under strict conditions.

Products will only be able to be dispensed by a pharmacist. However, there is still no legal product available in Australia.

There is little to no information available for what the situation in South Australia or the Northern Territory.

Patients who have been illegally using medicinal cannabis are applauding the changes, they fear it could be a decade before it is widely available to those who need it.

* With many restrictions

It’s a Very #Fibro Christmas Sing-a-Long

sing

84. maxine_stressOn the first day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
A bout of Anxiety

 

On the second day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

On the third day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
A bout of Anxiety

 

223. fibro

On the fourth day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

On the fifth day of 86. crawl into bedChristmas, FIBRO gave to me:
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

On the sixth day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
74. prescriptionsSix Medications
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

 

 

On the seventh day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
68. HatSeven Tension Headaches
Six Medications
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

 

 

On the eighth day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
205. centredTotal Disequilibrium
Seven Tension Headaches
Six Medications
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

On the ninth day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
292.FM LovesongNine Painful Cuddles
Total Disequilibrium
Seven Tension Headaches
Six Medications
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

On the tenth day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
Paresthesia in my (ten) Fingers
Nine Painful Cuddles203. acupuncture
Total Disequilibrium
Seven Tension Headaches
Six Medications
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

On the eleventh day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
Eleven ‘New Cures’ proffered
Paresthesia in my (ten) Fingers
Nine Painful Cuddlesxmas
Total Disequilibrium
Seven Tension Headaches
Six Medications
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety

 

On the twelfth day of Christmas, FIBRO gave to me:
Twelve Judgmental Relatives
Eleven ‘New Cures’ proffered
Paresthesia in my (ten) Fingers
Nine Painful Cuddles
Total Disequilibrium
Seven Tension Headaches
Six Medications124. indifferent friends
Five Sleepless Nights
Four Doctors’ Visits
Three Days of Heartburn
Two New Trigger Points
and A bout of Anxiety