#Fibromyalgia, Fatigue and some (naughty) Fun

I know that some of you cannot even think of having sex without bringing on a flare – Me? I’d put up with a flare at the moment for a little loving!

With Valentine’s Day approaching, imagine this:

It’s 9pm. You’ve just put the kids to bed. It’s been a long, exhausting day. It feels like 4 in the morning and you’re ready to fall over. Suddenly your other half looks at you in that way, smiles and strokes your arm, and you know he/she wants to ‘make lurve.’

So, what’s your reaction?

Decreased sexual interest is not considered a common characteristic of FM. Nonetheless, a 2005 Turkish study demonstrates that female patients with FM have distinct sexual dysfunction compared with healthy controls.292.FM Lovesong

What is Normal Sexual Function?

For women, sex is a complex issue because it involves both physical and emotional reactions. Normal sexual functioning, however, may be divided into specific stages that include:

  • Desire
  • Arousal
  • Orgasm
  • Relaxation

They are all tied together with feelings of fulfillment, satisfaction and pleasure. For a woman, this is achieved not simply through physical touching. It involves psychological and emotional engagement. It may be difficult at times to remain sexually engaged when your body is in pain or fatigued or you are experiencing low self-esteem.

Types of Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Fibromyalgia

Sexual dysfunction refers to the inability to either engage in or enjoy the sexual act. It occurs for a number of different reasons that include illness, the impact of medications on the body, or emotional distress.

Women with fibromyalgia may suffer from one or more types of sexual dysfunction. The more common types include:

  1. Decreased sexual desire or drive
  2. Less arousal but maybe adequate sex drive
  3. Difficulty in achieving orgasm
  4. Increased pain with sexual intercourse or vaginal contact
  5. Failure of the body to co-operate with the desired position or movement

I am not even pretending that I know how to help with the first three types. I feel I can offer some suggestion on the last two.

We already know that FM is more foe than friend.  While many of us are too tired for sex, it is the muscle pain that leads to pressure and a squeezing of the pelvic area and lower back that ultimately result in muscle cramping during sexual intercourse. This naturally causes a great deal of discomfort, making it difficult to engage in certain sexual behaviours.

Sex may eventually become something that is no longer pleasurable (I can’t believe I said that!), but a negative experience. One’s natural tendency is to avoid such physically intimate situations, especially given that one is too tired or sore for sex.

sexSo, who can be bothered? (Pick me! Pick me!)

Further, taking a toll on one’s sex life are FM medications that decrease libido and a man’s ability to attain or maintain erection. Anti-depressants can also take a toll on a person’s sexual functioning. A person living with FM may react negatively to bodily changes, like weight changes and the loss of muscle mass.

As lovers feel less connected in the boudoir, their sexual relationship takes a hit (ie: unless you take steps to stay mentally and spiritually connected while attempting to be physically intimate). It’s important to realise that the release of hormones and endorphins, natural opioids, during sex can help to relieve FM symptoms, like pain and depression, and boost well-being. This double-sided sword is that while sex can relieve symptoms of FM, FM itself may result in a decreased libido, and, definitely, fatigue and pain that hinder a person’s desire and ability to engage in sexual intercourse.

Maintaining your sex life is vital to your health and well-being. Consider adopting this plan on Tuesday:

  • Plan ahead to make this the night for sexual relations. Practice acceptance. Adapt. Make peace with the fact that you need to deal with this condition, and then allow yourself to reclaim your life in every way. This means ensuring you do not wear yourself out earlier during the day. You need to be well-rested so pace yourself.
  • If you have stiffness of your muscles or joints, consider ways to reduce the stiffness. Do some stretching to relax the muscles and make them limber.
  • Practice reducing stress. You can do breathing exercises. You can also combine exercise with stress reduction by playing soothing music while you do yoga. For some, a guided meditation or visualization will produce the desired result.
  • Take a warm bath or shower. A bath is excellent because it means you can pamper yourself. Play soft, romantic or sensual music and indulge in an sumptuous bubble bath
  • Prepare the room so it is relaxing, comfortable and reignites your passion. Clean, fresh, fragrant sheets can help. Pillows you can place to make positions easier are good tools to have handy. Soft lights and even softer music can also be effective in setting the right mood.
  • When it comes to the actual sex act, talk to your partner. Consider some positions that do not cause any discomfort but result in pleasure for both of you. Allow your partner to be more active during sex if possible (Absolutely nothing bad about THAT!) Talk it through.
  • Experiment with different sexual positions. There are plenty of activities and positions that are ideal for fatigue; and many ways to avoid painful sex. And have fun trying them ALL out! (see the attachment)
  • Enjoy each other despite flare ups. Part of this is not being so goal-oriented during a love-making session. Allow things to happen as they can.
  • Stay physically connected by just cuddling (unless such is not made possible by allondynia, where the brain misinterprets neutral or pleasant stimuli for pain).

The important thing is to learn what has produced your sexual dysfunction and to make an effort to maintain interest in sex. You can discuss any concerns you have with your doctor and your partner or spouse. Being honest with your intimate partner will help you maintain an active sex life.

Finally?

Don’t give up. It might feel like you’re never going to want to have sex ever again – but that’s the fibro talking, not you. Lust strikes at the oddest moment, and people can have sex in a myriad of ways. So have fun exploring what works best for you. and you’ll feel IT again.

And when you do, take advantage of it, and enjoy it!

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For those grown-ups among us (and those NOT easily offended), please check out these recommended sexual positions that require less physical exertion. This is adult content –  By clicking “I Agree” below, you are agreeing to the following:

  1. You are an adult, at least 18 years of age, you are familiar with and understand the standards and laws of your local community regarding sexually oriented media. You represent that, based on your familiarity with the standards and laws of your local community, you will not be violating any applicable standards or laws by requesting, receiving, downloading or possessing any of the video, audio, graphics, images or text (“Adult Material”) available on this Website.
  2. You hereby acknowledge that any use of this Website is at your sole risk. You understand that by accepting the terms of this Agreement, you are agreeing to hold the Publisher of this Web Site harmless from any responsibilities or liabilities related to your use of this Web Site and the Adult Material contained herein.
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It’s Legal to Grow Cannabis in Australia!*

mj-fmgirlOh, so much excitement about medicinal cannabis in our fibromyalgia family!

BUT do you know what’s happening here (ie: Australia)?

It is legal to cultivate and manufacture medicinal cannabis in Australia (Hold On! Keep reading!), which means people can apply for a licence to grow their own cannabis crop from the Office of Drug Control.

Since early November, through the Therapeutic Goods Administration, medicinal cannabis no longer falls under Australia’s most stringent of schedules, reserved for dangerous drugs. Instead, there are provisions in place to use it on medical grounds, with certain approvals but only for very ill people.

However, it will still be illegal to use or grow marijuana for recreational purposes.

It is up to the states to decide whether the drug will be allowed and who will be able to use it, dispense it, who will be able to approve it, and what dosage and form of medicinal cannabis is appropriate. And this is where things get murky (da,da, da, dum…)! Each state is trying to form or introduce its own legislation, while also considering the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961.

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The convention is set in place by the United Nations, and outlines how medicinal cannabis should be approached.

So, how does it work state by state?

  • If you are in Queensland, from March 2017 a specialist should be able to prescribe medicinal cannabis for certain patients who have illnesses including MS, epilepsy, cancer and HIV/AIDS. There are no age restrictions, but approval will only be provided by a doctor who needs to show evidence that medicinal cannabis could help the patient.
  • In New South Wales, medicinal cannabis will be available for end of life illnesses, but only for adults.
  • In Victoria, children with severe epilepsy will be able to access medicinal cannabis from early 2017.
  • The ACT is currently working on legislation that will include education sources for doctors. The legislation is expected to come into effect next year .
  • Tasmania is developing a Controlled Access Scheme, to allow patients to access unregistered medical cannabis. It is expected to come into effect next year.
  • The WA Government has recently passed changes supporting the federal legislation. That means that doctors are able to prescribe medicinal cannabis under strict conditions.

Products will only be able to be dispensed by a pharmacist. However, there is still no legal product available in Australia.

There is little to no information available for what the situation in South Australia or the Northern Territory.

Patients who have been illegally using medicinal cannabis are applauding the changes, they fear it could be a decade before it is widely available to those who need it.

* With many restrictions

How Many do You do?

Q. What do talking, showering, and doing laundry have in common?

A. They’re all activities that seem simple to most people, but can be thoroughly exhausting for us.

TheMighty.com partnered with the National Fibromyalgia Association to discover what everyday activities we engage in (or don’t engage in) because of fibromyalgia. How many do you do? Got any to add?

  1. “Not showering every day or keeping up with laundry. People see widget 5me as lazy but in reality, I’m prioritizing what I can do each day. Otherwise I’d be out for a month. It’s hard for people to understand how much energy and effort it takes to do the most simple tasks.”
  2. “I keep a lot of my curtains closed and the brightness on devices on lowest; when I’m having a flare light hurts me so much. My smell and hearing are too sensitive. Repetitive noises are agony to me.”
  3. “Napping. I hate sleeping during the day. I feel miserable when I nap, but if I don’t lie down, I will fall down. Some of my friends love to nap and envy me when I tell them I spent the afternoon in bed. To me, though, napping is just one more way my life is not my own now.”
  4. I clench my jaw really tightly when in pain (probably just looks like I’m pulling weird faces!). Also people think I’m strange for not drinking alcohol, but it reacts with my meds and a hangover feels a million times worse!”
  5. “I rub my hands a lot and sometimes my feet. Most people don’t think this is anything more than self-comfort. The reality is, the weakness and pain in my hands, arms and legs is something I deal with every day.”
  6. “This weekend I was at a wedding. Most people at my table were dancing and were trying to tell me to join them. They don’t know I was bravely smiling through the pain and that it was a two-hour battle just to get dressed up and show up. There was no strength left for dancing.”
  7. “Google-Earth-ing everywhere I have to go (or am considering going) and have never been before to assess if the building would have stairs (inside and out) and a parking spot nearby.”
  8. “I wear a lot of fuzzy socks because I have cold feet issues. Having fibromyalgia means when I get cold my pain gets elevated even worse. Ugg boots are also helpful because they are soft and warm.”
  9. “Avoiding family gatherings as much as possible. I come from a very big and loud family who likes to hug. I’m surrounded by all of them and the kids are running a round and everyone is talking laughing and having a good time. No one realizes how huge that sensory overload is for me.”
  10. “A prime example is ‘test-driving’ chairs to find the most comfortable one. At work, there are several office chairs in the main work area that are used by various people on all shifts, so they get moved around and swapped for each other pretty often. When I’m working in that area, I sit in each chair for a few seconds to see which one is going to cause me the least amount of pain throughout the day (the chairs are identical, but some are older/used more than others). People who don’t know I have fibro may find it odd or humorous, but I think even people who do know seem to find it ‘amusing’ at times.”
  11. 119-fibro-fog“I’m soon to be 27 and have the memory of a goldfish. I mix up words and stutter so bad. People don’t realize I have fibromyalgia and this is why I do this.”
  12. “Taking a deep breath as I reach the entrance door at work, putting a massive smile on my face. Chest out, shoulders back… keeping on my ‘I’m OK’ face until I crumble back into my car at the end of the shift.”
  13. “I really don’t talk much because I have fibro fog and find it hard to carry on a conversation. So this sometimes makes me appear disinterested in others, but that isn’t the case at all. I find it hard to find the words to say.”
  14. “When I have to stand for more than a couple of minutes I rock back and forth to distract myself from the pain. Most think it’s just a nervous habit, but in essence it’s my pain control.”
  15. Giving up my social life. I go to work, and I come home. That’s all I can manage to do. I have to choose between going to church, family activities, and meeting with friends over rest. And lately, rest wins.”
  16. “Sometimes I’m having a really bad flare and can’t get out. Rather than admitting my weakness, I say the kids are sick or something, so no harm, no foul. It makes me uncomfortable admitting it, and it makes them feel even more uncomfortable/angry/disappointed, etc.”
  17. “I walk out of work when my shift ends and drive right home. I don’t say goodbye to anyone because if we end up chatting it’ll be even longer until I get to lounge at home and rest.”
  18. “Turning down TVs and radios when people come in the room. The noise sensitivity makes sounds get louder the more there are different sounds. Each added person, instead of making it harder to hear something, amplifies the sounds.”
  19. “When you take an extra day off work from a holiday weekend. It’s not to just play around and be lazy. It takes me days to recover from travel, from cooking the Thanksgiving turkey, from Christmas shopping, even from just sitting in an uncomfortable chair eating a holiday meal with family and friends.”
  20. “In college, people don’t realize I always tell them, ‘I have to go to the bathroom, be right up with you guys’ because I don’t want anyone looking at me me while I slowly climb my painful way upstairs. So I always make up an excuse to be the last one to go up, and alone.”
  21. “I text instead of calling because I’m not sure how I’ll sound over the phone, and I can make the text sound positive without acting.”
  22. “I take a few minutes every so often when I’m out, like when I go to the bathroom or pop to the kitchen, and just sit and gather myself. Allow myself to feel the exhaustion and pain then breathe and go back in.”

Fibro – GAGA

Lady Gaga is well known for her unconventional…um…ways.

She is less known as a chronic pain sufferer.

Lady Gaga recently opened up about her chronic pain. (It’s been said that she suffers from Fibromyalgia but I have not found any confirming sources) She shared some of her methods for easing her pain in a series of posts on Instagram: some unusual and some just like ours.

Lada Gaga recently shared on Instagram details about her “frustrating” battle with chronic pain, along with two photos of herself getting treatment.

 

After an outpouring of support from her Instagram followers, Lady Gaga posted another photo of herself on Friday, showing the singer sitting in an infrared sauna wrapped in an emergency blanket. It’s a remedy she uses to relieve pain and inflammation.

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“I was so overwhelmed by the empathy, confessions & personal stories of chronic pain in response to my previous post I thought what the hell. Maybe I should just share some of my personal remedies I’ve acquired over the past five years. Everyone’s body and condition is different U should consult w ure Dr. but what the heck here we go!” she wrote.

“When my body goes into a spasm one thing I find really helps is infrared sauna. I’ve invested in one. They come in a large box form as well as a low coffin-like form and even some like electric blankets! You can also look around your community for a infrared sauna parlor or homeopathic center that has one.

“I combine this treatment with marley silver emergency blankets (seen in the photo) that trap in the heat and are very cheap, reusable and effective for detox as well as weight loss!”

Lady Gaga likes to alternate between hot and cold therapy.

“In order to not overheat my system and cause more inflammation i follow this with either a VERY cold bath, ice bath (if u can stand it, it’s worth it) or the most environmentally savvy way is to keep many reusable cold packs in the freezer (or frozen peas’ n carrots’!) and pack them around the body in all areas of pain,” she wrote.

Lada Gaga reportedly suffers from synovitis, a painful inflammation of the joints, that apparently stems from a hip injury she suffered during a concert.

After years of hiding her chronic pain from fans and even her own staff, Lady Gaga had surgery in 2013. She is now one of the few celebrities to speak openly about her experience with chronic pain.

Luckily for me, I recently found an online deal from LivingSocial.com.au that entitles me to a 90-Minute Flotation Session followed by an Infrared Therapy Session. Hopefully, I’ll be be one of these people who can share their successful methods of dealing with this pain.

“Hope this helps some of you, it helps me to keep doing my passion, job and the things I love even on days when I feel like I can’t get out of bed. Love you and thank you for all your positive messages,” wrote Lady Gaga.

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If You Poison Us, Do We Not Die?

industries_health_research and development_ Tarantula venom could provide relief from Irritable Bowel Syndrome_bannerTARANTULA venom is being used to help develop pain relief medications for people suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Researchers from The University of Adelaide in South Australia found that a specific peptide in the spider venom could be used to understand how people sense pain. Two toxins were found to specifically target Nav 1.1, a voltage-gated sodium channel in the nervous system to initiate the electrical impulses that signal pain.

Associate Professor Stuart Brierley said the study demonstrated that Nav 1.1 contributed to mechanical, but not thermal, pain signalling.

“Using the highly specific peptide in the spider toxin we were able to work out how pain nerve fibres signal in a healthy situation and also in chronic abdominal pain such as what you see in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS),” Assoc Prof Brierley said.

“We found that the spider toxin was able to cause a lot more pain in the IBS state than what it was in the healthy state. It’s important to note that because of the studies we should be able to develop treatments for IBS based pain – blockers for Nav 1.1 that only target the peripheral and don’t go to the central nervous system.”

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The causes of IBS are still unknown but it affects about 10 per cent of people globally (and lots of FMS patients). Chronic abdominal pain is the predominant symptom of IBS.

Assoc Prof Brierley said that until recently there had not been much research into the role of the Nav 1.1 channel subtype on the peripheral nervous system.

“Over a long period of time we were able to work out that one particular compound was in the venom that you could isolate, separate out and acted on this Nav 1.1 channel,” he said. “It gave us a highly specific and highly selective tool to look at its role in pain.”

Many nociceptors or pain sensing nerve fibres use Nav channels to initiate the electrical impulses that signal pain. Although the study focused on the peripheral nervous system, the findings also pose potential implications for central nervous system diseases such as epilepsy (and FMS)

The study was a collaboration between the University of Adelaide, Flinders University, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), the University of Queensland, The University of California, John Hopkins University and the Medical College of Wisconsin. It was published in Nature last week.

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It Can’t Hurt to Ask

The Australian Parliament is asking for public submissions into chronic disease prevention and management in primary health care.  This is our opportunity to write to them and ask them to fund research into Fibromyalgia and cater for patients who require home care, visits and support from medical professionals.

Despite an estimated one million Australians living with Fibromyalgia, there is limited services, support and information available. The gaps between research and daily care are unacceptable.

Now is the time to ask the Federal Government to provide:

  1. Leadership and coordination of a national approach to provide integrated management of Fibromyalgia services, building on the work of state governments, private sector providers, Medicare Locals and Local Hospital Networks.
  2. Access to quality services for all Fibromyalgia sufferers including people in rural, regional and remote areas, indigenous and socio-economically disadvantaged communities, children, and older Australians.
  3. Access to education and training for health professionals in particular as it relates to early intervention, multidisciplinary team practice and the early identification of Fibromyalgia.
  4. A public awareness campaign to address discrimination, misunderstanding and stigmatisation of people with pain within the community, including in the workplace and in welfare and compensation systems.
  5. Funding to provide community support services including consumer information, self-management education and telephone support (crisis help line).
  6. The development of a national research agenda to address gaps in knowledge about Fibromyalgia and improve clinical practice in pain management.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, 31 July 2015.

Please make a submission if you can.

 

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Pain or No Brain?

Ages and ages ago (except it doesn’t feel that long ago – doesn’t time fly when you’re in a fibro fog!), I (with my doctor’s advice) weaned myself off Lyrica to see if we could find a better way to deal with this condition. If you followed the posts, you’ll remember that I ended up at Step 1 again and back on it…almost immediately.

Basically, it seemed, I was given the choice of being in pain (no Lyrica) or no brain (with Lyrica). I chose no pain.

I am beginning to question my choice…as my brain and everything in it quickly turns to mush.

119. fibro fogLyrica (and Neurontin, by the way) blocks the formation of new brain synapses, drastically reducing the potential for rejuvenating brain plasticity – meaning that these drugs will cause brain decline faster than any substance known to mankind! (This is not me being OTT – this is a quote by some-one else.)

Synaptic plasticity is a key feature of nerve architecture that enables your brain to tolerate stress, recover from trauma, and make changes. That’s how your brain bounces back from intense stress (or not, in our case). Hmmm….and that could be why I just can’t seem to quit smoking. Our brains, on Lyrica, are no longer flexible or “plastic.”

Doctors use them for all manner of nerve issues because they are good at suppressing symptoms. However, can we justify this use now that the actual mechanism of the drugs is finally understood? – they are creating a significant long-term reduction in nerve health.

148. fibro fogTo make matters worse (yes, they can get worse), antidepressants block the action of acetylcholine. What does acetylcholine do, you might ask? It is the primary neurotransmitter involved with memory and learning. And, how many of us take antidepressants? I know that I do. See what I mean by things getting worse?

Can it really be right to force us to make this kind of choice?

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Marbles, Spoons & the Whole Megillah

Have you tried to explain chronic fatigue syndrome and/or fibromyalgia to some-one who just doesn’t get it? How about to your kids?

marblesExplaining why you can’t do the things other moms and dads do is a challenge but Melinda Malott’s book How Many Marbles Do You Have? Helping Children Understand the Limitations of Those With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & Fibromyalgia provides a simple, easy to understand way to do that. How fabulous to finally be able to say to your child, “Here’s a book about what’s happening to me.” It’s a great way to explain ME/CFS or FM without overburdening your children with things they don’t need to know and probably won’t understand.

What is your story with ME/CFS?

MMMelinda: I became symptomatic in March 2006.  At the time, my son was 18 months old and my daughter was 3 ½.  My symptoms progressively got worse until May of 2009 I was reduced to the confines of my home almost exclusively for 2 years.  I have had some improvement.  My improvement coupled with a management strategy has really helped me.  I am still unable to work or do any physical exercise to speak of, but I lead a full life as a wife and mother of two.

Why did you choose to do a children’s book?

Melinda: I remember the day my children came into my bedroom and both started crying.  They thought I was dying. I was too sick to try to explain, and as the clouds dissipated I came up with the marble and jar analogy.  I had looked online for resources and there were NO books to be found for children.

How did you approach telling children about ME/CFS?  

Melinda: I have a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a Master’s degree in community health education, but my formal education did not prepare me to explain something as complex as CFS and fibromyalgia to young children.  I decided rather than try to explain something I couldn’t understand that it was best to try to help my children understand my limitations. Using a jar and some marbles I was able to say yes and no without having to say I was in pain, or I didn’t feel good or I was tired.  I could simply say I was out of marbles.  Don’t get me wrong, they know I have bad days. I just don’t feel the need to amplify that for them.  They see it first-hand.  The marbles and the jar lessen the notion of a momma who is suffering.

You can visit Melinda at her website.

This is the book we’ve been waiting for—a story for children of parents with Fibromyalgia or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. In fact, I plan to buy a copy for all my loved ones, so they’ll better understand what my life is like. It all depends on how many marbles are in my jar each day—the perfect metaphor for explaining the unpredictability and the ups and downs of Fibromyalgia and CFS. At the end of the book, Malott writes “… a heart full of love beats a jar full of marbles any day.” Not only is this book informative and insightful, it’s a heart full of love in itself.

Toni Bernhard, the author of How to Be Sick

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Innate Magic

A while ago, I wrote about starting to see a Network Chiropractor and I’ve been a bit hesitant about writing about my experiences so far. I really don’t want to sound like I’m selling this modality to you – I’m just telling you how it has affected me. I cannot say whether it will work for you or not; and, whether you choose to try it or not, is up to you.

That being said…I am currently a huge fan!

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It took me 2 years to go see Con (my chiropractor). My friend, Thais, had recommended him; and I had even been to one of her appointments to see what happened. It looked like hocus pocus. But it had gotten to the stage where I was ready to just throw in the towel regarding treatment…so off I went.

Firstly, it’s expensive. The initial consultation was $120 and each subsequent consultation is $50 – if you have private health insurance, you may get some money back. I have been seeing Con for 7 weeks. For the first couple of weeks, I saw Con three times a week. We are now at twice a week. It will move to once a week in about 2 weeks. I think it really, really started working about 3 weeks ago. If I didn’t think it was working, I would have given up already just because of the cost.

I have an abundance of energy – so much so that my body is having trouble keeping up with me: on Sunday, I played football with my 4 year-old nephew and went to my 1 year-old cousin’s birthday party, then shopping with my Mommy; yesterday, I started the day with an energizer yoga session followed by a 1 hour hydrotherapy session. I’m sleeping better – waking up is still awful (and takes about 2 hours) and my body still aches (not sure if it’s from all the exercise or from the FM). I’m holding myself straighter and taller. And, generally, I just feel better.

Mommy is coming with me this week because she can actually SEE that I am happier and more energized; and she wants some, too!

So what is it?

Now, to the technical:
Network Spinal Analysis™ care is an evidence based approach to wellness and body awareness. Gentle precise touch to the spine cues the brain to create new wellness promoting strategies. Two unique healing waves develop that are associated with spontaneous release of spinal and life tensions, and the use of existing tension as fuel for spinal re-organization and enhanced wellness. Practitioners combine their clinical assessments of spinal refinements with patient’s self-assessments of wellness and life changes. Greater self-awareness and conscious awakening of the relationships between the body, mind, emotion, and expression of the human spirit are realized through this popular healing work.

What does it feel like?

You know that magic trick where the magician puts his beautiful assistant in a box and then stabs swords into her?

This is the complete opposite. Con pulls OUT swords of pain at each appointment. It amazes me. I don’t understand how it works…and, to tell you the truth, I don’t really care. I am just so relieved to be feeling more like ME. I don’t understand how I can feel Con working on other people who are also in the room (or them me); and, guess what? I don’t really care.

I feel better (and that’s all that matters!)

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If you’d like to give NSA a try, you can find a practitioner through the Association for Reorganizational Healing Practice.

If you’re in Melbourne, Australia and in the South-Eastern suburbs, you might want to visit Con at Innate Wisdom.

 

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Networking News

283. thought for the dayTomorrow, I’m going to see a chiropractor. Hold on! Before I start hearing the pros and cons of all the different therapies from you, this is not a ‘normal’ chiropractor, me thinks. This is a Network Chiropractor.

A Network Chiropractor uses Network Spinal Analysis, a chiropractic system of light touches that claims to have helped improve Fibromyalgia symptoms and achieve greater health. Network Spinal Analysis alleges to help the body create new connections between brain and body. It is a gentle technique that is well suited to people living with Fibromyalgia. Light touch is used along specific areas of the spine causing large-scale changes across the entire body.

The gentle touches, applied with as much force as putting in a contact lens, are made over specific areas called “spinal gateways”. Gateways are critical information processing centres for our nervous system. They’re how the nervous system can monitor and regulate on our inner and outer environments. They are focal areas for free energy and with light touches can help the nervous system to unwind, heal and growth. When a Gateway is contacted the body naturally breathes and moves, stretches, awakens, and releases stuck energy and stress. With regular care, this ability becomes deeply ingrained.

Functioning optimally, the nervous system helps all parts of the body to communicate with each other. It allows us to sense and adapt to ever-changing internal and external environments.

If our pain experience comes from a mis-wired brain, how do we address the pain and get back to health? Pain medication, usually the first resort, can quiet the nerves. Unfortunately, pain meds modify the experience only and not the underlying issue. Take away the medication and the pain returns. Why? The nervous system is still misinterpreting signals as painful. Reorganizing the nervous system is the key to health.

How do we improve the health of the nervous system and correct the signal distortion? We need to reorganize the sensors, wiring and switches. We need to rewire the nervous system.

So, if you had the opportunity to re-boot your system and Network Spinal Analysis could rewire our nervous systems for greater healing, growth and well-being, wouldn’t you? Don’t get your hopes up yet. I hear it may take a while but, if it does, I will be sure to let you know!

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