Shiatsu Saviour

Last night, Mommy surprised me by taking me for a shiatsu massage. Almost every day, we pass EastWest College, which is a school that delivers training for the professional practice of Therapeutic Massage, Shiatsu, Oriental and Complimentary therapies. Almost every day, we have said that we should go there. So last night, we did.

Shiatsu literally translates as ‘finger pressure’ and is a Japanese therapy originating in Oriental medical theory and traditional Japanese massage techniques.

Shiatsu therapists treat the whole body as well as specific problem areas by addressing both emotional and physical wellbeing. The aim is to treat the body by balancing the flow of Ki (life energy); applying pressure to obstructed or weak areas. This relieves symptoms and resolves conditions, improving the patient’s strength and vitality. The patient lies on a thin mattress on the floor, not a massage table which means the practitioner can use his/her body weight to increase pressure where it is needed, often synchronising the pressure with your breathing. Generally it is very relaxing and although some acupoints will be more tender than others.

Shiatsu is recognised as being suitable for treatment of most common conditions including musculoskeletal, menstrual, digestive and immune system disorders as well as being one of the most effective therapies for stress management and relaxation.

Currently, there is a randomized clinical trial being carried out by the University of Sao Paulo General Hospital, with the aim of verifying the efficacy of Shiatsu in the improvement of pain, flexibility, quality of sleep, anxiety and quality of life of individuals with FM. (This study is ongoing but no longer accepting participants.)

The EastWest College offers massage and reflexology as well as Shiatsu, so I know that I’ll be going back – in fact, I have already phoned and left a message.

The massage courses offered by EastWest College cover many of the different styles of massage such as Relaxation, Swedish, Sports, Remedial, Shiatsu and Lymphatic.  Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of Oriental and Western Massage, which allows graduates to acquire professional skills in Oriental tactile medicine in combination with the popular musculoskeletal therapy of Remedial and Therapeutic Massage.

I have talked about reflexology before as a healing art that uses acupressure and massage on the feet, hands or ears to promote relaxation, alleviate pain, treat illness, and stimulate the body’s ability to heal itself. Reflexology aims to help the body’s energy circulate effectively without blockages, stagnation or energy loss by manipulating reflex points in the feet, hands or ears. Unlike acupuncture, reflexology is non-invasive.

Not so excited about students working on you?

Firstly, it was fabulous – my masseuse/student explained everything that she was doing, made sure that I wasn’t hurting too much (I had told her about my FM); and, actually built up a sweat working and stretching out my tired and taut body. Maybe I was lucky but Mommy (with sciatica) was thrilled with her massage, too.

Next, it is totally supervised. This is not one of those 6 week courses that people do at the local college – these are nationally and internationally accredited courses over 12 -24 months. Does that make the thought more comforting to you?

And finally, it was $15 for an hour!!! (that’s introductory – normally $35) You really can’t beat that.

I know that this particular college is in Melbourne, Australia but perhaps you may now consider giving the opportunity to students, near you, to learn (and become aware of FM) while receiving the benefit of a great treatment!