Thunderball

007 heads to Malvern East to recover Good Health and Energy stolen by SPECTRE agent nicknamed Fibromyalgia in an international extortion scheme.

I have now been on the Daiichi Sankyo sanctioned medication for 7 days. It would be absolutely fantastic if my medication was the placebo because I’m feeling pretty damn good; and that would mean that my Fibromyalgia was gone.20151002_132317

090915 Kimba pot 1Today I woke up, took Kimba (my puppy) out for some play, did a load of washing, hung it out in the sun; and folded some dry laundry. A pretty good morning! So, I doubt that I’m on the placebo.

It hasn’t all been smooth sailing, though. A couple of nights ago, I had to put some ointment in a place that we don’t talk about in good company. It’s a reoccurrence of an ‘accident’ that happened quite a while ago. The wonderful ointment for this lovely and embarrassing condition has the possible (and very probable for us) side effects of headaches and dizziness. Ta Da! Two minutes after application, stabbing pain in the left side of my head – not happy, Jan! The minimal amount of Panadol that I am permitted (in the research study) couldn’t touch the pain. I knew that if I could just get rid of the headache (I was sure the headache was from the ointment and not the new drugs), I’d be okay. The headache (and extreme light sensitivity – you know how it is) lasted 3 days.

Today, I woke up…energised! Bring on the good feelings!

 

NOTE: Emeritus Research is still recruiting for the study, if anybody is interested. Click for  the Consent Form and information. Contact Daiichi using this email address – SM_DS5565_FM_Info@incresearch.com.

As well as the 1000 person study in the US and Canada, Daiichi is also recruiting in:

  • Campse and Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia;
  • Maroochydore, Sherwood and Southport, Queensland, Australia;
  • Hobart, Tasmania, Australia;
  • Malvern East, Victoria, Australia;
  • Tallin and Tartu, Estonia;
  • Baldone, Jekabpils, Liepaja, Ogre and Riga, Latvia;
  • Auckland, Hamilton, Nelson, Tauranga and Wellington, New Zealand;
  • Banska Bystrica, Bratislava and Dubnica Nad Vahom, Slovakia; and,
  • Reading, Berkshire; Chesterfield, Derbyshire; Wellingborough, Northamptonshire: Atherstone, Warwickshire; and
  • Belfast, United Kingdom.

Posts in this series:

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From Japan With Love

007 willingly falls into an assassination ploy involving a naive Russian Japanese pharmaceutical company in order to retrieve a cure for Fibromyalgia that was stolen by SPECTRE.

russia

I’ve been keeping an electronic diary for the research study. Each morning, it asks me what is the highest level of pain I have experienced over the past 24 hours. Yes, I hate that question…and now I get to answer it at least once a day.

By the time I started the diary, I had not had any pain meds (except Panadol) for 4 days. Bloody! Bloody! I had forgotten about the stiffness and inability to sleep so on Friday, after 3 hours sleep, I thought: well, I haven’t been in this kind of pain in a very long time (it’s funny how I forget how bad the pain actually was at its worse) but it’s not a 9 or 10 – I’m not in hospital so I answered:

pain

On Saturday, the mind-blowing headaches in the bones above and below my eyes were back. Bummer! I had forgotten about those; but, I thought: well, I haven’t been in this kind of pain in a very long time but it’s not a 9 or 10 – I’m not in hospital so I answered:

pain

On Sunday, the costochondritis returned. I lay on my couch all day under a heated blanket; but, I thought: well, I haven’t been in this kind of pain in a very long time but it’s not a 9 or 10 – I’m not in hospital so I answered:

pain

On Monday, my stomach and lower back began spasming. Oh, here comes the irritable everything syndrome. I thought: well, I haven’t been in this kind of pain in a very long time but it’s not a 9 or 10 – I’m not in hospital so I answered:

pain

On Tuesday, I had a funeral so I didn’t fill in anything all day – I was afraid to take my electronic diary with me because I couldn’t work out how to turn off the alarm.

On Wednesday and Thursday, my hands and feet felt (but didn’t look) swollen and full (I can’t think of any other word), so uncomfortably full so, I thought: well, I haven’t been in this kind of pain in a very long time but it’s not a 9 or 10 – I’m not in hospital so I answered:

pain

Each day the pain had gotten worse but I had started too high on the scale. It was never the worst pain I have ever experienced but, each day should have been higher than the day before.

Maybe it’s time to consider a different way to ask the question? Maybe it should be, if yesterday was a 5, how much pain have you experienced in the last 24 hours? And then, is it more (or less) pain than yesterday?

NOTE: Emeritus Research is still recruiting for the study, if anybody is interested. Click for  the Consent Form and information. Contact Daiichi using this email address – SM_DS5565_FM_Info@incresearch.com.

As well as the 1000 person study in the US and Canada, Daiichi is also recruiting in:

  • Campse and Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia;
  • Maroochydore, Sherwood and Southport, Queensland, Australia;
  • Hobart, Tasmania, Australia;
  • Malvern East, Victoria, Australia;
  • Tallin and Tartu, Estonia;
  • Baldone, Jekabpils, Liepaja, Ogre and Riga, Latvia;
  • Auckland, Hamilton, Nelson, Tauranga and Wellington, New Zealand;
  • Banska Bystrica, Bratislava and Dubnica Nad Vahom, Slovakia; and,
  • Reading, Berkshire; Chesterfield, Derbyshire; Wellingborough, Northamptonshire: Atherstone, Warwickshire; and
  • Belfast, United Kingdom.

Posts in this series:

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A Voice for Fibromyalgia?

Leah Tyler

This has been re-blogged from Leah Tyler at the Chronicles of Fibromyalgia:

Dear Pfizer,

Last night one of your commercials for Lyrica came on TV. In this ad a woman claimed her overactive nerves, caused by Fibromyalgia, gave her pain and kept her from doing the things she wanted to do in life. Obviously she went on to tout the praises of your drug, but I wasn’t listening. Instead, I was hung-up, obsessing, and ranting and raving over the use of one word, wanted. Fibromyalgia kept her from doing the things she wanted to do in life? Like rock climbing or going to an Eminem concert? Because this Fibromyalgia patient over here experienced a completely different reality. Not only did Fibromyalgia keep me from doing the things Iwanted to do, it also kept me from doing the things I had to do, like washing my hair and going to work. And I know a hell of a lot more patients sing my song than Miss Wanted To Do’s.

I have added this video as we don’t have ads for prescription drugs on TV (and I’m not sure about all other countries):

Needless to say, as a nine year veteran of Fibromyalgia, I found this phrasing offensive. In short, here’s my beef; You’re $opping up the dough off a disease that isn’t technically a disease, because nobody knows what causes it. So it wouldn’t hurt too much to throw us patients a bone, would it? Because we’re in a pickle and sure could use your help. Not only is Fibromyalgia the leading pain condition diagnosed in the USA, patient symptoms run the gamut, with a range of fluctuating severity. It affects everyone differently, and to make it even more convoluted, the treatments do, too. Please understand I am an educated consumer. In no way am I holding any pharmaceutical company responsible for sourcing the cause and cure of this mysterious ailment. And I’m well aware of how expensive the process of developing a drug, testing it, and bring it to market actually is. I’m even hip to the efforts your company invests in regarding Fibromyalgia awareness and cause advancement. But maybe it’s because of these reasons I’m actually pissed at you.

I know you pay a pretty premium for the advertising, but as of right now, Pfizer, you are the voice of our illness. Countless patients have lost their ability to function from Fibromyalgia, along with their jobs, families, friends and homes. Fibromyalgia is a devastating reality hotly debated in the crossroads of modern and psychiatric medicine, yet nobody can deny the number of patients is only growing larger. As the only other source of the word “Fibromyalgia” to many people in our society, other than ‘strange Aunt Sally who doesn’t like to leave her house’, you would do the aforementioned injustice a world of good if the chick on the Lyrica commercial said had. ‘Fibromyalgia kept me from doing the things I had to do in life.’ It would give millions of people some much-needed validation.

Thank you for your consideration,

Leah Tyler

I’m probably looking at this from a different point of view than most: I have been trying to encourage all of us, via this site, Facebook and Twitter, to become a voice for Fibromyalgia by sending emails, sharing posts or tweeting; and, then, on May 12th, lighting up their home with purple bulbs (this part is the only bit that may require some physical exertion). (Don’t know what I’m talking about? Check this out.) However, due to the very nature of our condition, it is so difficult to get many of us to actually do any of this…so, yes, it is sad that, despite how hard some of us try, Lyrica ads are the only voice for us!

 

Int Fibro

The Bitch is Back (literally)

It’s 6.10am and I am amazed by how much pain I am in.

work_625175_7_flat,550x550,075,f_purple-painMainly, I am amazed because I forget, in between flares, about how bad these can actually be; how much we actually put up with. I don’t normally write when I feel like this because I really can’t be bothered…and, then when they’re over, it never feels like it could have been THAT bad…WRONG!

So here goes (from toes upwards): both my little toes feel like they are being squished by my shoes (like they are every time I wear any time I wear any kind of shoes) except I haven’t worn any shoes in 3 days!

Purple-Stiletto-Heels (1)The balls of my feet feel like they have spent at least 10 hours in a pair of stilettos partying – once again, I can’t remember the last time I wore a pair of heels. You know those Dr Scholl sandals with the funny nodules – those nodules are growing on the inside of my soles. And there’s a spot where I had a papilloma which is now growing up the inside of my calf muscle, despite being removed when I was twelve. Sounds so bizarre, right? Welcome to my central nervous system!

Every muscle in my calves has cramped up; and I have used every single technique that the physio at rehab taught me, applied every cream and ointment from my box of tricks…everything!

b27293cc-66ff-4474-89ba-f809cfb092ad-tmpMoving upwards (and you may want to miss this paragraph if you don’t like to share too much information): 10 days ago, I suffered an anal fissure due to constipation – yeah! fabulous! Since then, it has felt like my insides have been cramped up completely. I have been taking turns at both constipation and diarrhoea while having a very sore ass the entire time! Needless to say, I am too scared to leave the house, in case my insides should just decide to drop out! Hey! It could happen!

Now the wonderful ointment that the doctor gives you for this lovely and embarrassing condition has the possible (and very probable for us) side effects of headaches and dizziness. Ta Da! I’ve continued with non-stop headaches and dizziness.

greenhealth_07_pmsLet’s move to another orifice. My period is due tomorrow so during all of this I have been pre-menstrual. Aren’t you guys lucky that you don’t have to be anywhere near me at the moment!

You’ll be happy to know that my chest, shoulders and neck seem to fine right now so we can miss those…otherwise this could be one really long bitching session.

great make upThe pain in my cheek and jaw bones (I’m told it is a continuation of migraine pain) is not reacting to anti-inflammatories, or any other pain medication – bring on the Botox injections (and the possible addition of Botox to the PBS in March). And I have had a giant case of face leakage for the last 3 days – and no wonder when you read all of this crap, really.

One can’t help but feel sorry for oneself in this state.

Maybe a sleeping tablet will help and I’ll wake up feeling better?

Hidden Pain or Thick Fog?

Now, I get it.

When I was first diagnosed, my doctor put me on Lyrica immediately; and then, it was steadily increased. If you’ve been reading this blog, you’ll know that I’m weaning off it. (If you’re not up to date, check Whatever…Nothing!) Well, I’m up to Week 4: I’m pissed off, short-tempered and in pain.

doses

It has even ruined the best part of my week: my shiatsu massage.

Last week’s massage was fabulous. This week, however, was another story; and, as I said at the beginning, now I understand how some of you can’t stand a massage.

pain 1pain 2The same place (no idea what it’s called) was incredibly sensitive but it got to the stage where if Peter touched my shoulder, that spot hurt; if he touched my arm, that spot hurt; if he touched my knee, (you guessed it) that spot hurt.

pain 3pain 4In fact, by the time the hour was up, if Peter touched anything, that spot hurt!

pain 5

Why the hell am I doing this to myself?

Well, the good news is that the Fibro Fog has lifted. So tell me, which would you prefer: the pain or the fog?

♩♫ Lyric(a) Writing is an Interesting Process ♫♩

So Week 3 started today…my body aches just a little more each day, the fog is not lifting (which I really thought it would), and my face hurts beyond words.

doses

It doesn’t help that I had to go to the dentist for a Crown preparation so last night was spent with some frozen vegetables attached to my cheek.

And I’ve hit exhaustion – I think I have over-loaded myself with the Thunderclap campaigning (nagging), blogging every day, reminding contributors for the next issue of LIVING WELL with FIBROMYALGIA, tweeting, my shop and my FB page – it’ll all quiet down after May 12th but right now, I keep getting anxious that I’ve forgotten something to do. spireI’m also trying to get ‘them’ to light a spire (that we have in Melbourne) in PURPLE for May 12th (looking forward to a night-time picnic with Thais (did I tell you she’s back?) under the spire – anyone else coming? You can help by emailing the appropriate people)

I’m also trying for Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House but I think I’ve left that one too late! (If you want to help with this one: tweet to @VividLive  Niagara Falls will B PURPLE from 10:15-10:30PM EST on May 12 for #Fibromyalgia Awareness: can we light up the Bridge & Opera House?

sydney opera house Sydney_Harbour_Bridge01

So I haven’t had a chance to FEEL anything. I just want to rest BUT I don’t feel I can as this is the lead-up to Awareness Day (I can rest afterwards, right?).

I try not to nap during the day (no matter how bad it gets) but today, I fell asleep for 4 hours.

My body just wants to stop – but, as you can see, I have no idea if it’s medication related or just life!

Sampling Side Effects

So, you know when you walk into the doctor’s office and there’s a ton of pens with the logos of different drugs, calendars sponsored by Big Pharma, and samples galore?

Pharmaceutical-(sm)x300Because of these visual reminders and visits from company representatives, doctors are more likely to prescribe these drugs. However, these drug company salespeople provide family doctors with little or no information about the harmful effects of medicines they are promoting, states a new study.

And, despite this lack of knowledge, doctors are still likely to start prescribing these drugs, according to the findings from questionnaires completed by American, Canadian and French doctors.

The study revealed that the reps failed to provide information about common or serious side effects or warn doctors about types of patients who should not use the medicine in 59 per cent of their promotions.

“Laws in all three countries require sales representatives to provide information on harm as well as benefits,” lead author Barbara Mintzes, of the University of British Columbia, said in a university news release. “But no one is monitoring these visits and there are next to no sanctions for misleading or inaccurate promotion.”

Serious risks were mentioned in only 6 per cent of the promotions, even though 57 per cent of the medicines involved in these visits came with the strongest types of drug warnings.

“We are very concerned that doctors and patients are left in the dark and patient safety may be compromised,” Mintzes said.

So, remember doctors do NOT know everything…be your own advocate, do your own research and ask questions!

La ♫ La ♪ La…Lyrica(l) Lullaby

So it’s been a week since Whatever…Nothing! – that means the first week of Lyrica weaning is over.

doses

I can’t say that I’ve noticed much change: I had some huge headaches and face pain but that can be blamed on a cracked tooth that now needs a crown (bloody! bloody!); I had a couple of totally fogged out days but that was nothing really different; and today, I had an amazingly great day – just because sometimes (and hopefully more often), that just happens.

I think tonight’s reduction may make more of a change because it’s a reduction of the night dose. If Lyrica is as good at helping us sleep as they say so, then I may start experiencing some trouble. Of course, I hope not and I’m really not expecting any trouble…yet!

Week 3 (and onwards) scares the hell out of me…and you’ll get to hear ALL about it (hee! hee! Lucky you!)

Got Fibro? Now What?

Ok, you have a diagnosis…now what’s going to happen?

ae78c7c2bc0e5642e361bf001c101af9Most likely, your doctor is going to give you medication. There are many different medications used to manage FM, including pain medicines, sleeping pills, and antidepressants.  Some help ease pain. Others boost mood and improve sleep. Working with your doctor will help you find the right medication to add to your multi-faceted comprehensive treatment regimen. That way, you can begin to manage your symptoms effectively…

The first medication doctors will often try is an anti-depressant (this does NOT mean you are necessarily suffering from depression!), which helps relieve pain, fatigue, and sleep problems. Nonetheless, depression is commonly seen in people with FM.

Older anti-depressants, called tricyclics (including Elavil (amitriptyline) and Pamelor (nortriptyline)), have been used for many years to treat FM. They work by raising the levels of chemicals (neurotransmitters) in the brain.

Tricyclic anti-depressants increase levels of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. People with chronic pain often have decreased levels of these calming neurotransmitters. Tricyclics can relax painful muscles and heighten the effects of endorphins – the body’s natural painkillers. While these medications are often very effective, the side effects can sometimes make them difficult to take as they may cause drowsiness, dizziness, dry mouth, dry eyes, and constipation.

There are numerous types of anti-depressants and several of them have been shown to help relieve the pain, fatigue, and sleep problems in people with FM.

pillsThe most well-studied anti-depressants for FM include Cymbalta (duloxetine), Savella (milnacipran), and Effexor (venlafaxine). Cymbalta and Savella are specifically FDA-approved to treat FM. There is less medical research to show that Effexor helps FM. Other anti-depressants that have also been studied for FM and may help include Prozac (fluoxetine), Paxil (paroxetine), and Celexa (citalopram).

That’s a lot of different choices to work through and yes, it’s all trial and error to see what works for you. What works for one person with FM may not work for someone else. Different anti-depressants work differently in the body. That’s why you may have to try more than one anti-depressant to find the one that best relieves the pain, fatigue, and sleep difficulties. Your doctor may even want you to try a combination of more than one anti-depressant at a time.

Then, there are different types of pain relievers, sometimes recommended to ease the deep muscle pain and trigger-point pain that comes with FM. The problem is these pain relievers don’t work the same for everyone, either.

article-new_ehow_images_a05_sc_bu_can-nexium_-800x800Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), when taken alone, don’t typically work that well for FM. However, when combined with other medications, NSAIDs often do help. NSAIDs are available over the counter and include drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. Further, the over-the-counter pain reliever acetaminophen elevates the pain threshold so you perceive less pain. Acetaminophen is relatively free of side effects. But avoid this medication if you have liver disease.

You also need to be careful taking aspirin or other NSAIDs if you have stomach problems. These medications can lead to heartburn, nausea or vomiting, stomach ulcers, and stomach bleeding. Don’t ever take over-the-counter NSAIDs for more than 10 days without checking with your doctor. Taking them for a prolonged period increases the chance of serious side effects.

Sometimes, your doctor will prescribe the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine. has proved useful for the treatment of FM. It has proved to be helpful with easing muscle tension and improving sleep. Muscle relaxants work in the brain to relax muscles; but you may experience dry mouth, dizziness, drowsiness, blurred vision, clumsiness, unsteadiness, and change in the colour of your urine. These medications may increase the likelihood of seizures, confusion and hallucinations.

Most recently, Lyrica, originally used to treat seizures, is being used to treat FM. Lyrica affects chemicals in the brain that send pain signals across the nervous system. So it reduces pain and fatigue and improves sleep.

Neurontin (gabapentin) is another anti-seizure medication that has also been shown to improve FM symptoms.

SMFM-278Other medications include pain relievers such as Ultram (tramadol) which is a narcotic-like medication that acts in the brain to affect the sensation of pain. However, it is not as addictive as narcotics.

In addition, doctors may prescribe benzodiazepines such as Ativan (lorazepam), Klonopin (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), and Xanax (alprazolam) to help relax painful muscles, improve sleep, and relieve symptoms of restless legs syndrome. Benzodiazepines are addictive and must be used with caution on a short-term basis. Taking more than recommended increases the risk of serious side effects, including death.

Powerful narcotic medications, such as Percocet and OxyContin (oxycodone) and Vicodin and Lortab (hydrocodone), should only be considered if all other drugs and alternative therapies have been exhausted and there is no relief.

All of this seems quite daunting which is why you need to surround yourself with a team you trust, which may include doctors, friends and/or family. The most consistent treatment advice that all the experts in FM try to promote is a multi-faceted approach. So, as well as all these medications, you will need to explore a whole range of complementary treatments.

FCKI don’t mean to scare you; in fact, I am trying to help by blogging about research and my experiences with different activities (please explore the site). There is also a directory of other FM bloggers that allows you to find people who are going through the same stuff as you.

Is it Giving Up or Acceptance?

imagesA couple of weeks ago, I wrote that I haven’t reached the acceptance stage on the ‘grief scale’ so I don’t think I am qualified (am I ever?) to write about the topic of ACCEPTANCE however I read the following post by Jen Reynolds of FibroTV:

Acceptancesliderlogo

FibrotvartworkI think one of the most difficult issues to deal with when you are diagnosed with a chronic illness is acceptance. For the first couple years I was angry, in denial, and did everything I wanted to and paid big time every time I did.  I was very young (18) when I was diagnosed and I just wanted to do everything my friends were doing. It was almost like I had to prove to them and myself I was not going to change and would even push harder than a healthy person. I was working full-time  taking care of my boyfriend’s 2 kids 3 to 4 days out of the week, keeping up a 3 bedroom house,  and keeping a very hectic social calendar. This is when I started taking a lot of medication to cover up the symptoms of the poor choices I made that affected my health and began to decline rapidly.

There is almost a mourning process when you get diagnosed. On one hand I was happy they figured out what was wrong but on the other, all I wanted was to be normal again. I held on to a lot of anger because I wanted my life back the way it was. I would try to stay busy every second of the day because once I stopped the pain would be unrelenting and I would think about it more if I did not keep busy. I felt that accepting I was ill was giving in or giving up. What I later realized is that acceptance was key to begin my journey to wellness.

Giving up means that you feel hopeless and that nothing that you do can change the situation so you let yourself go. I ended up doing this for about 12 years. At one point I was on 12 medications and went from 97 pounds to almost 200 pounds in a year. I ate what I wanted because I had the attitude that if I was going to be like this for the rest of my life I should at least be able to enjoy what I eat. I did not know that the food I was eating was making me have more pain and more fatigue. I just did not connect food to pain because it made me feel good to eat it!  I ate fast food at least once a day and I loved having a donut for breakfast because it was cheap and fast before I went to work. My breakfast consisted of a donut or two, a Dr Pepper, two Vicodin  and a Soma. No wonder why I felt so bad! Everything I put into my body when I first woke up had 0 nutrition value and was toxic. I was basically in denial about my health and denied any personal responsibility for taking charge of it and taking care of my body. I would tell myself, ”I did not ask to be sick it is not my fault!” It was not my fault I got sick that is true, but it was my fault for treated my body the way I was and I continued to decline health wise because of it!

Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don’t resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.

~Lao Tzu

I eventually accepted that I had fibromyalgia and started to work on my health. It was actually very empowering to accept that I had fibromyalgia and that I needed to take care of myself physically/mentally/and spiritually. I felt like I had at least some control of my body again.  I started not “overdoing it.” I dropped the process foods with the exception of going out to eat once a week and I started working on my mind and spirit. Once I started doing these things I started seeing small improvements in my health. At times it was very frustrating because the results were so small and they were slow but every small success adds up! It was much easier popping a pill and having that little relief for a short period of time! I saw quick results that way but I developed rebound pain that was even worse than the fibromyalgia and it just was a vicious cycle for me so I made the very personal decision (with the help of my doctor) to go off the medications. Once I got off all the meds (which took about a year) I could not believe the difference in my pain levels.

No matter how sick you are and what stage you are with your acceptance of your chronic condition there are things you can do to improve your health that will decrease pain and help you live a more full and productive life. For each person it will be different depending on what they have and what the underlying cause is for their condition. There is always an underlying cause of a health condition and unfortunately Western medicine never tries to figure it out and gives medications to cover up symptoms. It is just the way Doctors are trained here. They are trained to diagnose and prescribe medications accordingly. We can see with the rapid increase of chronic illness this is not working.  We are in a Nation that supports sick care – there is no “health” in healthcare right now. It is going to be up to YOU to find the underlying cause. The best way to do that is to look back to when you first became ill and what happened during that time. Good Nutrition is always a positive for the body and will make you feel better. Also many conditions are caused from food intolerance’s to ether wheat, dairy, and chemicals in foods that are not supposed to be in the body. If you do have a intolerance to one of these things it is a good thing because that can be resolved! I highly recommend that everyone get tested for food allergies and intolerance’s because it is such an easy fix. BUT we are not just physical beings, so if there are any unresolved issues from your past that cause unresolved anger and resentment that is something that must be dealt with in order to see your symptoms decrease.

Life is a journey and the choices you make every day affect the quality of your life. No one can make positive changes for you, that is something you have to do for yourself. You may always have some symptoms but you can live well-being chronically ill. It will take some lifestyle changes and change is very hard. Us humans are stubborn and resist change, but without change everything will stay the same. If something is not working move forward to the next thing until you find what works best for you. Don’t give up! Accept and move forward making positive healthy choices for yourself. You deserve it!

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