Obsessed with Poo!

poo 1After another uncomfortable visit to the toilet, I decided to Google ‘Focal Nodular Hyperplasia’ and ‘IBS.’ I found absolutely nothing that linked the two but I did find another study that shows that nearly all patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Diarrhea (IBS-D) actually have a different condition!

It was found that patients thought to have IBS-D – a condition which affects up to 15 per cent of the US population (35 million Americans (US study so US statistics – I’m sure the figures apply to other countries, too)) – may in fact have a different condition altogether.

This was the largest study to date and indicates that doctors may use IBS-D as a blanket diagnosis, rather than cite a collection of separate medical conditions.

According to the study, 98 per cent of participants were found to have a diagnosis different from the initial presentation of IBS-D. This study refutes the existence of IBS-D as a single medical entity and implies that this diagnosis is simply a catch-all diagnosis. The findings also revealed that 68 per cent of the participants actually had conditions related to treatable (that means that 68 per cent of us could actually feel better!) bile acid induced diarrhea as a result of gallbladder dysfunction.

A dysfunctional gallbladder that produces an abnormal amount of bile causing chronic diarrhea can be very treatable, as opposed to IBS, for which physicians and patients often search for treatment to alleviate the discomfort, often to no avail.

bird_pooAccording to the study, once patients were accurately diagnosed, 98 per cent experienced a favourable response (that is, the elimination of urgency and incontinence for at least three months). Wouldn’t that be nice? The end of a lifetime of discomfort, unease and frustration!

“The results of this study demonstrate quite convincingly that many patients may needlessly be going through the physical and emotional pain of IBS and functional diarrhea when, in reality, they may be afflicted with something else that is easily treatable,” said Saad F. Habba, M.D., gastroenterologist at Overlook Hospital and the study author.

Test results

  • 41 per cent were found to have Habba Syndrome (a relatively new entity relating dysfunctional gallbladder with chronic diarrhea , which is successfully treated with bile acid binding agents);
  • 23 per cent of the study subjects were diagnosed with post cholecystectomy diarrhea;
  • 8 per cent had lactose intolerance; and
  • 7 per cent had microscopic colitis.

Doesn’t quite add up to the 98 per cent – but it still shows that there is some hope!