Sampling Side Effects

So, you know when you walk into the doctor’s office and there’s a ton of pens with the logos of different drugs, calendars sponsored by Big Pharma, and samples galore?

Pharmaceutical-(sm)x300Because of these visual reminders and visits from company representatives, doctors are more likely to prescribe these drugs. However, these drug company salespeople provide family doctors with little or no information about the harmful effects of medicines they are promoting, states a new study.

And, despite this lack of knowledge, doctors are still likely to start prescribing these drugs, according to the findings from questionnaires completed by American, Canadian and French doctors.

The study revealed that the reps failed to provide information about common or serious side effects or warn doctors about types of patients who should not use the medicine in 59 per cent of their promotions.

“Laws in all three countries require sales representatives to provide information on harm as well as benefits,” lead author Barbara Mintzes, of the University of British Columbia, said in a university news release. “But no one is monitoring these visits and there are next to no sanctions for misleading or inaccurate promotion.”

Serious risks were mentioned in only 6 per cent of the promotions, even though 57 per cent of the medicines involved in these visits came with the strongest types of drug warnings.

“We are very concerned that doctors and patients are left in the dark and patient safety may be compromised,” Mintzes said.

So, remember doctors do NOT know everything…be your own advocate, do your own research and ask questions!

Pain Pill Mistakes that may lead to a Ketamine Infusion

As regular readers know, about 3 weeks ago, I had a ketamine infusion. Part of the reason for this was I was addicted to codeine-based painkillers. I was unable to go cold-turkey and undertook the infusion to avoid all those horrible withdrawal symptoms.

Basically, this addiction came about because I made some pretty common pain pill mistakes.

Mistake No.1: If 1 Is Good, 2 Must Be Better

Doctors prescribe pain pills at the doses they believe will offer the greatest benefit at the least risk. Doubling or tripling that dose won’t speed relief. But it can easily speed the onset of harmful side effects.

“The first dose of a pain medication may not work in five minutes the way you want. But this does not mean you should take five more,” Kristen A. Binaso, RPh, spokeswoman for the American Pharmacists Association, says. “With some pain drugs, if you take additional doses, it makes the first dose not work as well. And with others, you end up in the emergency room.”

If you’ve given your pain medication time to work, and it still does not control your pain, don’t double down. See your doctor about why you’re still hurting (and, hopefully, there is something that will help more).

pills“This ‘one is good so two must be better’ thing is a common problem,” says pain specialist Eric R. Haynes, MD, founder of Comprehensive Pain Management Partners in Trinity, Fla. “Patients should follow the instructions their doctor gives. Ask before leaving the office: Can I take an extra pill if I still hurt? What is the upper limit for this medication?”

Another bad idea is trying to boost the effect of one kind of pain pill by taking another.

“There may be Advil, Tylenol, Aleve, and ibuprofen in the house, and a person may take them all,” Binaso says.

This can escalate into a very bad situation, Haynes says – welcome to a fast-forward approach to end up with a cannula in your arm and a week worth of ketamine!

Mistake No. 2: Duplication Overdose

People often take over-the-counter pain drugs – and even prescription pain drugs – without reading the label. Never a good idea – it means that you often don’t know which drugs you’re taking.

And if you take another over-the-counter drug – for any reason – you could wind up in a hospital ER with an overdose. That’s because many OTC drugs are combination pills that carry a full dose of pain pill ingredients.

Mistake No. 3: Drinking While Taking Pain Drugs

Pain medications and alcohol generally enhance each other’s effect. That’s why many of these prescription medications carry a “no alcohol” sticker.

“A common misperception is people see that sticker and think, ‘I’m OK as long as I don’t drink liquor – I can have a beer.’ But no alcohol means no alcohol,” Binaso says.

“The patient should heed that alcohol warning, because it can be a major problem if they do not,” Haynes says. “Alcohol can make you inebriated, and some pain medications can make you have that feeling as well. You can easily get yourself into trouble.”

Drinking alcohol can be a problem even with over-the-counter pain drugs.

Mistake No. 4: Drug Interactions

PILLSBefore taking any pain pill, think about what other medicines, herbal remedies, and supplements you are taking. Some of these drugs and supplements may interact with pain medications or increase the risk of side effects.

I suggest you try a drug interaction checker, if in doubt; and/or keep an updated list of your medications on your phone or computer so you can give your doctor a complete list of all the drugs, herbs, and supplements you take – before getting any prescription.

If buying over-the-counter medications, Binaso recommends showing a list of everything else you’re taking to the pharmacist.

Mistake No. 5: Drugged Driving

Pain medications can make you drowsy. Different people react differently to different drugs.

“How I react to a pain medication is different from how you react,” Binaso says. “It may not make me drowsy, but may make you drowsy. So I recommend trying it at home first, and see how you feel. Don’t take two pills and go out driving.”

Mistake No. 6: Sharing Prescription Medicines

Unfortunately, it’s very common for people to share prescription medications with friends, relatives, and co-workers. Not smart, Haynes and Binaso say – particularly when it comes to pain medications.

“If a fairly healthy person is taking a medicine because she is in pain, and wants to give some pills to Uncle Joe because he is hurting – well, this is a potential problem,” Haynes says. “Uncle Joe may have a problem that keeps his body from eliminating the drug, or he may have an allergic reaction, or the drug may interact with a medication he is taking, with life-threatening results.”

Mistake No. 7: Not Talking to the Pharmacist

22. pillIt’s not easy to read drug labels, even if you can make out the small print. If you have a question about either a prescription or OTC drug, ask the pharmacist.

“That’s why I’m in the store,” Binaso says. “You may have to wait a couple of minutes for me to finish what I’m doing. But you’ll get the information you need to take the right medicine the right way. Just say, ‘Tell me about this medicine; what should I be on the lookout for?'”

Mistake No. 8: Hoarding Dead Drugs

Pills stored at home start breaking down soon after their expiration date. That’s especially true of drugs kept in the moist environment of the bathroom medicine cabinet.

“People say, “That drug is only a year past its expiration date; isn’t it good?” But if you take a pill that’s broken down, it may not work – or you may end up in the emergency room because of reaction to a breakdown product. That is really common,” Binaso says.

Another reason that it’s dangerous to hoard is that the drugs may tempt someone else (your son or daughter?) into making a very bad choice.

Mistake No. 9: Breaking Unbreakable Pills

Pills are actually little drug-delivery machines. They don’t work the way they’re supposed to when taken apart the wrong way.

“Scored pills should be cut only across the line,” Binaso says. Those without scoring should not be cut at all, unless you’re specifically instructed to do so.

“When you start chopping up pills like that, the pill may not work,” she says. “We find more and more people are doing this. And then they say, “Oh, that pill had a really bad taste. That is because they cut away the coating.”