Lab Rats Wanted

Are you willing to put your body on the line? Or might you be at the end of your tether and willing to try anything?

As it is beyond me to list EVERY research study on FM, here are all the studies that are currently recruiting in the top 6 countries where my blog is being read:

*** If you live in another country, visit ClinicalTrials.gov, then enter your country and ‘fibromyalgia’ in the search box…you never know what you might find ***

Australia

NIL

Canada

A Phase 3b Multicenter Study of Pregabalin in Fibromyalgia Subjects Who Have Comorbid Depression

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin; Drug: placebo

The Impact of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements on Fibromyalgia Symptoms

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Dietary Supplement: Omega-3 (oil); Dietary Supplement: Fatty Acids (placebo)

Online Acceptance-based Behavioural Treatment for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Acceptance-based behavioural therapy;   Other: Will vary per participant

India

Adolescent Fibromyalgia Study

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: placebo; Drug: pregabalin (Lyrica)

A Study of Duloxetine in Adolescents With Juvenile Primary Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Duloxetine; Drug: Placebo

Pregabalin In Adolescent Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: pregabalin

Israel

Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Israel

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

Effect of Milnacipran in Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Minalcipran; Drug: Placebo

Peripheral Arterial Tonometry (PAT) Evaluation of Sleep in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

Study Assessing the Efficacy of Etoricoxib in Female Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: etoricoxib

Cognitive Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia Patients

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

United Kingdom

NIL

United States of America

Observational Study of Control Participants for the MAPP Research Network

Conditions: Fibromyalgia; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome,

Interventions:

Pain and Stress Management for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Stress and Emotions; Behavioural: Thoughts and Behaviours; Behavioural: Brain and Body

Adolescent Fibromyalgia Study

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: placebo; Drug: pregabalin (Lyrica)

A Phase 3b Multicenter Study of Pregabalin in Fibromyalgia Subjects Who Have Comorbid Depression

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin; Drug: placebo

A Study of Duloxetine in Adolescents With Juvenile Primary Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Duloxetine; Drug: Placebo

Pregabalin In Adolescent Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin

Combined Behavioural and Analgesic Trial for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Tramadol; Drug: Placebo; Behavioural: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for FM; Behavioural: Health Education

Quetiapine Compared With Placebo in the Management of Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: quetiapine; Drug: Placebo

Cyclobenzaprine Extended Release (ER) for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia; Pain; Sleep; Fatigue

Interventions: Drug: cyclobenzaprine ER (AMRIX); Drug: placebo

Tai Chi and Aerobic Exercise for Fibromyalgia (FMEx)

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Lower frequency, shorter period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Higher frequency, shorter period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Shorter frequency, longer period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Higher frequency, longer period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Aerobic Exercise Training

Effects of Direct Transcranial Current Stimulation on Central Neural Pain Processing in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Procedure: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

Lifestyle Physical Activity to Reduce Pain and Fatigue in Adults With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Lifestyle physical activity (LPA); Behavioural: Fibromyalgia education

Neurotropin to Treat Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Neurotropin

Effect of Milnacipran on Pain in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Neurotropin

Investigation of Avacen Thermal Exchange System for Fibromyalgia Pain

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Device: AVACEN Thermal Exchange System

Phase 2 Study of TD-9855 to Treat Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: TD-9855 Group 1; Drug: TD-9855 Group 2; Drug: Placebo

Cymbalta for Fibromyalgia Pain

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Duloxetine

Effects of Milnacipran on Widespread Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia of Fibromyalgia Patients

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Milnacipran

Qigong Exercise May Benefit Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Intervention Group; Behavioural: Placebo Comparator: Control Group

Effect of Temperature on Pain and Brown Adipose Activity in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia, Pain

Interventions:

Effect of Milnacipran in Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Minalcipran; Drug: Placebo

The Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Dry Eyes

Conditions: Dry Eye, Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

Evaluation and Diagnosis of People With Pain and Fatigue Syndromes

Conditions: Fatigue; Fibromyalgia; Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome; Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Interventions:

The Functional Neuroanatomy of Catastrophizing: an fMRI Study

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; Behavioural: Education

A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Pregabalin (Lyrica) for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Conditions: Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin (Lyrica); Drug: Placebo

 

 

Moving Meditation

Alarm had to wake me today –three times. Ankles and wrists feel like they’ve swollen to about 5 times their size (that’s another thing I hate – I feel swollen without any visible swollen-ness!) with really, really tight manacles holding me down on the bed.

But I had to get up as it was my first class of Tai Chi for Arthritis (beginners).  Tai Chi is an ancient practice proven to reduce pain and improve your mental and physical well-being. In 1997, Dr Paul Lam, a family physician and tai chi expert, worked with a team of tai chi and medical specialists to create the Tai Chi for Arthritis program. The special features of this unique program are that it is easy to learn, enjoyable, and provides many health benefits in a relatively short period of time.

So lesson one: Tai Chi for Arthritis is based on Sun style tai chi (pronounced “soon” as in– I will soon be learning tai chi!). This style was chosen because of its healing component, its unique Qigong (an exercise which improves relaxation and vital energy), and its ability to improve mobility and balance. The program contains a carefully constructed set of warming-up and cooling-down exercises, Qigong breathing exercises, a Basic Core six movements, an Advanced Extension six movements, and adaptations of the movements so you can use a chair for balance, or even sit on the chair for the entire class. Also incorporated into the program is a safe and effective teaching system.

Medical studies have shown that practicing this program reduces pain significantly, prevents falls for the elderly, and improves many aspects of health. For these reasons, Arthritis Foundations around the world have supported the program. And that’s why I’m at Arthritis Victoria today…they also provide the cheapest classes (and I received an added discount due to hardship!)

Supposedly, tai chi will help you:

  • Reduce stress
  • Increase balance and flexibility
  • Feel relaxed
  • Improve your overall mind, body and spirit

Tai Chi for Arthritis involves 12 movements or positions that are designed to be safe and beneficial for people with arthritis. Instructors of the program are trained to understand arthritis and ensure the movements are safe for participants. Tai Chi for Arthritis classes begins with warm-up exercises (lasting about 10 minutes) where you start at your head and move all the way down to your ankles. Each joint has two exercises, to reduce the chance of injury during the movements.

The leader then demonstrates and teaches one or two movements per lesson, encouraging us to learn the movements properly and slowly, working within your comfort limits. This week, we started with the Single Whip and Wave Hand in Cloud.

Single Whip

I start with my feet in a duck position (outward facing) and my hands by my side. Slowly lift your wrists, straight out and up, like two helium balloons are attached, up to shoulder height. the slowly lower them.  Then, while stepping forward with your right leg (heel first the toe), push your hands forward like you’re handing a ball to someone. Bring the ‘ball’ back (and your foot at the same time) to hold in front of you – then spread your arms by opening up your elbows. Allow your left hand to keep moving outwards (and slightly back) and watch it by twisting your head as far as you can go. Your right hand sort of just sits in mid-air waiting for something to do.

Ta Da! We’ve learnt our first form.

Wave Hand in the Cloud

From the position we left above, now move your left hand forward again, until it looks like you are trying to say stop. Your right hand moves beneath your left elbow – now you look like a traditional policeman trying to stop traffic. Take a step to the right, landing with your toe first followed by your heel – then wipe your right hand in front of your face, while your left hand moves to your right elbow. Remember Karate Kid? Wax on. Let your left leg move across to join your other leg (remember toe then heel) and wax off with your left hand. We do that 3 times, moving across the room. Then do it the opposite way. This is where we all get tangled up and obviously need to practice. My head doesn’t change direction that fast!

But hey! we’re doing tai chi! I think that was all the movements – at least, what I can remember from my first one hour session. It is all very slow, controlled and relaxing – just like in the movies – sort of like a moving meditation, as you’re concentrating so hard on breathing, moving hands and feet that you can’t think about anything stressful.

The lesson ends with cool-down exercises, lasting about three minutes.

I feel very calm and relaxed. But my wrists and ankles still hurt!