Spreading Your Eggs…

The most consistent treatment advice that all the experts in FM try to promote is a multi-faceted comprehensive treatment approach. do_not_put_all_your_eggs_in_one_basketThose who have followed this blog for a while know that I have always promoted this advice: this means NOT putting all your eggs in one basket…

Over time, you can validate what works best to alleviate your pain. A number of lifestyle changes and other treatment methods can have a cumulative positive effect on the pain you experience.

Here is a list of some commonly used treatment options:

  1. Conventional medicines — Your doctor will work with you to discover what prescription medicines may work best for you. Options are many including pain and antidepressant medicines.
  2. Nutrition and diet — Some researchers believe that the foods you eat can affect FM symptoms.
  3. Dietary Supplements — Vitamins and minerals play important roles in health and maintenance of the body.
  4. Exercise — Exercise helps relieve joint stiffness and can help alleviate some of the pain as well. Short workouts have been proven to help many of us. Pain may initially increase, but then gradually decreases. Hydrotherapytai-chi and yoga are excellent forms of exercise. These forms of exercise incorporate relaxation and meditation techniques. Deep breathing and slow movement will reduce your stress level and increase your fitness.
  5. Physiotherapy — A physiotherapist can help you with stretching and good posture. Stretching will reduce joint and muscle stiffness. This therapist can also  help you with relaxation techniques, another powerful FM treatment option.
  6. Relaxation therapy — Stress aggravates FM. Reducing stress will provide you with a more restful sleep, improving symptoms.
  7. Massage therapy — This is another great relaxation technique.
  8. 270. aspirinOver-the-counter drugs — You will need to work with your doctor. Always talk to your doctor about any over-the-counter medications you plan to take.
  9. Herbal remedies — Many herbs have medicinal healing powers. Again, you must talk to your doctor when using herbal remedies
  10. Chinese medicine — Consider exploring Chinese medicine which places great emphasis on herbal remedies and incorporates life energy healing techniques.
  11. Homeopathy — Visit a homeopathic specialist. They specialize in natural remedies to illnesses.
  12. Acupuncture — Modern adherents of acupuncture believe that it affects blood flow and the way the brain processes pain signals. Studies have shown this may be effective for FM.
  13. Chiropractic care—Chiropractors specialize in spinal problems, which can be a major source of pain for some people.

Your odds of gaining a significant reduction in symptoms, and improving your quality of life through a combination of many different treatment options, is pretty good…if you get the right combination.

There are thousands of different options and combinations of options. What works best?

Somehow you have to record all the treatments you are trying, how you feel on a particular, what happens when you add a new modal. It’s not easy…I can’t even keep track and that’s part of the reason I started this blog…you forget that you took that extra pain-killer because your head was killing you on Wednesday, or that you missed your hydrotherapy session because your stomach was acting up.

That really is the great challenge with fighting Fibro – the BEST combination of treatments will be different for each individual. (Isn’t that the bit that sucks the most? Hearing that everyone is different?)

We need to remember that we (YOU) are the centre point of treatment, by focusing on treatments that match our own lifestyles, abilities, symptoms and resources. The problem is that a personalized treatment approach to FM relief cannot be developed without a firm understanding of the symptoms and co-morbid conditions that require treatment (and I’ve been trying to research it all for over a year…and I keep finding new symptoms!).

We must also establish a trustworthy support team to assist us in pursuing not only all the different treatment options, but the execution of the treatments chosen. Effective teams typically include the patient’s primary care physician, various specialists (e.g., rheumatologists, neurologists, dietitians, psychologists), as well as friends, family, and even members of fibromyalgia support groups.

And finally (if all of that was not enough), specific and achievable goals must be set in order to measure the effects of EVERYTHING!

Weighing-up-the-benefits-with-the-risks-of-virtualisation

It is vitally important to constantly and consistently observe and evaluate the treatment methods being used. Through this whole process, we get frustrated over and over again! Our reality is an ongoing trial-and-error approach to treatment. AAARGGGGHHHH!

However, it is crucial to treatment success and must be embraced as a necessary evil.

When trying to determine a personalized course of treatment, we need to forget the agendas of physicians, pharmaceutical companies, and other external entities. Our decisions need to be driven by both symptoms and causal factors. Examples of important questions to ask during this process include:

  • What symptom do I want to address?
  • How will this particular treatment impact that symptom?
  • What are the potential side effects of this treatment?
  • Does this treatment have the potential to interact with other treatments I am using?
  • What will this treatment cost?
  • What are my expected results and in what time frame should I anticipate to note results?

Throughout this process, it is important to remember that successful relief is highly individualized (again!) and will vary between patients. What appears to be a miraculous treatment for me may fail to provide any benefit to you.

This whole process takes more time (yes! most of us have had to wait years for a diagnosis and now we have to take more time!).

A trial and error evaluation process is most effective when employed in a scientific manner meaning that different treatment elements should often be tested in isolation. I know that when I read about CoQ10 and D-Ribose and Sam-E, I started taking them all at the same time. I am now no longer able to tell which supplement or combination of supplements is actually driving the results they may experience. It is impossible to accurately measure specific results to associate with any individual option, so I need to start again…again!

If you’d like to see iHerb’s selection of supplements, click here. Use Coupon Code LHJ194 to get $10 off any first time order over $40 or $5 off any first time order under $40.

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Where, oh Where…?

So, I’ve spent most of the day looking at current research and trying to find something to write about; BUT it’s all so BLAH!

203. acupunctureYes, acupuncture has been found to help those suffering from FM – where’s the new information in that?

Yes, marijuana has been shown to help those suffering from FM – where’s the new information in that?

Yes, dysmenorrhea is especially common in FM – where’s the new information in that?

Obesity, tai-chi, hydrotherapy,  shiatsu, reflexology, yoga – it’s all the same…there is nothing new!

I’ve kept reading, checking Facebook, watching tweets and I can’t find anything! And, obviously, I have done nothing else to tell you about. So, I’m setting you a mission: can you find (somewhere, anywhere) something new about FM?

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Related Articles:

Lab Rats Wanted

Are you willing to put your body on the line? Or might you be at the end of your tether and willing to try anything?

As it is beyond me to list EVERY research study on FM, here are all the studies that are currently recruiting in the top 6 countries where my blog is being read:

*** If you live in another country, visit ClinicalTrials.gov, then enter your country and ‘fibromyalgia’ in the search box…you never know what you might find ***

Australia

NIL

Canada

A Phase 3b Multicenter Study of Pregabalin in Fibromyalgia Subjects Who Have Comorbid Depression

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin; Drug: placebo

The Impact of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements on Fibromyalgia Symptoms

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Dietary Supplement: Omega-3 (oil); Dietary Supplement: Fatty Acids (placebo)

Online Acceptance-based Behavioural Treatment for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Acceptance-based behavioural therapy;   Other: Will vary per participant

India

Adolescent Fibromyalgia Study

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: placebo; Drug: pregabalin (Lyrica)

A Study of Duloxetine in Adolescents With Juvenile Primary Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Duloxetine; Drug: Placebo

Pregabalin In Adolescent Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: pregabalin

Israel

Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Israel

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

Effect of Milnacipran in Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Minalcipran; Drug: Placebo

Peripheral Arterial Tonometry (PAT) Evaluation of Sleep in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

Study Assessing the Efficacy of Etoricoxib in Female Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: etoricoxib

Cognitive Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia Patients

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

United Kingdom

NIL

United States of America

Observational Study of Control Participants for the MAPP Research Network

Conditions: Fibromyalgia; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome,

Interventions:

Pain and Stress Management for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Stress and Emotions; Behavioural: Thoughts and Behaviours; Behavioural: Brain and Body

Adolescent Fibromyalgia Study

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: placebo; Drug: pregabalin (Lyrica)

A Phase 3b Multicenter Study of Pregabalin in Fibromyalgia Subjects Who Have Comorbid Depression

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin; Drug: placebo

A Study of Duloxetine in Adolescents With Juvenile Primary Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Duloxetine; Drug: Placebo

Pregabalin In Adolescent Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin

Combined Behavioural and Analgesic Trial for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Tramadol; Drug: Placebo; Behavioural: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for FM; Behavioural: Health Education

Quetiapine Compared With Placebo in the Management of Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: quetiapine; Drug: Placebo

Cyclobenzaprine Extended Release (ER) for Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia; Pain; Sleep; Fatigue

Interventions: Drug: cyclobenzaprine ER (AMRIX); Drug: placebo

Tai Chi and Aerobic Exercise for Fibromyalgia (FMEx)

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Lower frequency, shorter period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Higher frequency, shorter period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Shorter frequency, longer period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Higher frequency, longer period of Tai Chi; Behavioural: Aerobic Exercise Training

Effects of Direct Transcranial Current Stimulation on Central Neural Pain Processing in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Procedure: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

Lifestyle Physical Activity to Reduce Pain and Fatigue in Adults With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Lifestyle physical activity (LPA); Behavioural: Fibromyalgia education

Neurotropin to Treat Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Neurotropin

Effect of Milnacipran on Pain in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Neurotropin

Investigation of Avacen Thermal Exchange System for Fibromyalgia Pain

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Device: AVACEN Thermal Exchange System

Phase 2 Study of TD-9855 to Treat Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: TD-9855 Group 1; Drug: TD-9855 Group 2; Drug: Placebo

Cymbalta for Fibromyalgia Pain

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Duloxetine

Effects of Milnacipran on Widespread Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia of Fibromyalgia Patients

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Milnacipran

Qigong Exercise May Benefit Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Intervention Group; Behavioural: Placebo Comparator: Control Group

Effect of Temperature on Pain and Brown Adipose Activity in Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia, Pain

Interventions:

Effect of Milnacipran in Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Drug: Minalcipran; Drug: Placebo

The Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Dry Eyes

Conditions: Dry Eye, Fibromyalgia

Interventions:

Evaluation and Diagnosis of People With Pain and Fatigue Syndromes

Conditions: Fatigue; Fibromyalgia; Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome; Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Interventions:

The Functional Neuroanatomy of Catastrophizing: an fMRI Study

Conditions: Fibromyalgia

Interventions: Behavioural: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; Behavioural: Education

A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Pregabalin (Lyrica) for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Conditions: Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Interventions: Drug: Pregabalin (Lyrica); Drug: Placebo

 

 

Good Vibrations

Vibration can help reduce some types of pain, including pain from FM, by more than 40 per cent, according to a new study published online in the European Journal of Pain.


When high-frequency vibrations from an instrument were applied to painful areas, pain signals may have been prevented from travelling to the central nervous system, explains Roland Staud, MD, professor of rheumatology and clinical immunology in the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville.

If you think of a pain impulse having to travel through a gate to cause discomfort, the vibrations are closing that gate. “When the gate is open, you feel the pain from the stimulus. It goes to the spinal cord. When you apply vibration you close the gate partially,” says Dr Staud. You can still feel some pain, but less than you would have felt without the vibrations, he adds.

Subjects were split into 3 groups: 29 had FM, 19 had chronic neck and back pain and 28 didn’t have any pain at all. Dr Staud and his research team applied about five seconds of heat to introduce pain to each participant’s arms and followed that with five seconds of vibrations from an electric instrument that emits high-frequency vibrations that are absorbed by skin and deep tissue.

A biothesiometer

A biothesiometer

Dr Staud used a biothesiometer, an electric vibrator (not THAT kind of vibrator – get your mind out of the gutter!) with a plastic foot plate that can be brought into contact with the patient’s skin.

Compact TENS

Compact TENS

Similarly, you could buy/borrow a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator (TENS), which is a medical device, designed specifically for the purpose of assisting in the treatment and management of chronic and acute pain; and it does exactly what Dr Staud is suggesting. I am currently borrowing a compact TENS machine. The pulse rate is adjustable from 1-200 Hz.

Following the use of heat and vibration, patients were asked to rate the intensity of their pain on a 0-to-10 scale and found that the experimental pain, as opposed to their chronic pain, was reduced by more than 40 per cent with the use of vibration. What was of particular interest was that the patients in the study with FM appeared to have the same mechanisms in their body to block or inhibit pain through the use of vibration as those in the pain-free group.

“Fibromyalgia patients are often said to have insufficient pain mechanisms, which means they can’t regulate their pain as well as regular individuals. This study showed that in comparison to normal controls, they could control their pain as well,” Dr Staud explains.

What they don’t know is how long the pain relieving effects will last.

I used the TENS on my arms two days ago and the pain has not returned (yet! Knock on wood!) If I choose to buy it, it will cost me $175.00 from www.tensaustralia.com.au

Dr Howard, a rheumatologist and director of Arthritis Health in Scottsdale, Ariz., says this study is still very interesting. “Vibration is another way of minimizing pain, and it sounded like it would be more helpful for regional or local pain rather than widespread pain,” he says.

Dr Staud says this theory is still very much in the testing stages and the vibrating instrument used in this study isn’t available to the public. “Although we didn’t test it, I think that the size of the foot plate of the biothesiometer is relevant. I wouldn’t suggest that everybody should go out and by any vibrator to use for pain relief. But pending a commercial product this is entirely feasible,” he explains.

Until then, Dr Staud’s message for patients is that vibration involves touch, and that can provide pain relief.

Dr Howard agrees that this study reinforces the importance of touch therapy, like massage, and even movement therapy, like gentle exercise, for people with chronic pain.

“When you have pain, you want to stop what you’re doing and protect the area. But for some types of pain that’s not the right thing to do,” Dr Howard says.

You do, however, need to know what types of pain touch is good for and for which ones it isn’t. Dr Howard says his general rule is to baby your joints and bully your muscles.

“Fibromyalgia patients often shrink away from touch therapy and movement. The foundation of treatment is to use movement and touch and stimulus to help with their pain, but their natural reaction is to withdraw and avoid tactile activity. Don’t be afraid. Don’t avoid it,” Dr Howard says.

Good forms of touch therapy include massage and the use of temperature – both hot and cold. Good forms of movement therapy include tai chi, yoga and swimming/warm water exercising.

 

Excuses! Excuses! Excuses!

Last night I went to hydrotherapy. Holy cow! Major workout!

Technically, it was no different to all my other classes (in fact, we have a set routine) but my body really didn’t like moving. I’m guessing that it’s because it’s been about a week and a half since my last session (which was a self-help session), where I felt like I was moving through molasses!

I had given up my self-help session while I was attending rehab as I went to a hydro class there, but their hydro was very low impact and I had built up my session to be quite physical – so it seems that I had lost my momentum during all of this.

Mind you, I am finding it harder to walk the same distance that I do every day – but I am still doing it, at least!

Because it is (seemingly?) getting harder, it would be easy to just say that the exercising is not helping my FM – a very self-sabotaging mode of thought – BUT we know we should be exercising. All the research tells us so! But when it comes time to actually get out there and start moving, many of us have a long list of excuses not to exercise:

Excuse #1: I Don’t Have Time!

What is it that is sapping all your time?

If it’s your favourite TV shows, how about during your shows, you use resistance bands, or walk in place; or you could record your shows so you can skip the commercials and see a one-hour show in just 40 minutes – that’s a 20 minute walk right there!

If it’s work that’s sapping all your spare time, try exercising on the job. Close your office door and walk in place for 10 minutes. (It’s not a long time but it all counts!)

People who exercise regularly ‘make it a habit’ – they don’t have more time than anyone else; instead, they have prioritised their exercise time as something that needs to be done and is of great value.

Excuse #2: I’m Too Tired…(said in a whining voice)

It may sound counter-intuitive  but working out actually gives you more energy, says Marisa Brunett, spokeswoman for the National Athletic Trainers Association. Once you get moving, you’re getting the endorphins ( the feel-good hormones in your body) to release – in turn, this WILL make you feel better (in the long term).

Excuse #3: I Don’t Get a Break From the Kids.

This is the time to multi-task (says the woman without kids!) Take the kids with you – while they’re swinging, you can walk around the playground or the backyard. Walk the kids to school instead of driving them. During their soccer games or practices, walk around the field. Use your family time for active pursuit – go for a bike ride with your kids or just walk around the neighbourhood with your children. When the weather’s bad, you could try all those new exciting interactive video games like Dance Revolution, Wii Sport, and Wii Fit. (Do your kids want any of these as a Christmas present? They could be a gift for you, too!)

Excuse #4: Exercise Is Boring.

“Exercise should be like sex,” says sports physiologist Mike Bracko, EdD, FACSM, a certified strength and conditioning specialist and director of the Institute for Hockey Research in Calgary. “You should want it and feel good about it before you do it. And it should feel good while you’re doing it.”

So how do you get there? First, find an activity you love. Think outside the box: try dancing, walk to the post office or gardening. Or, if you love music, try ballroom dancing. There IS an exercise for everyone.

If it makes exercise more enjoyable for you, it’s okay to watch The Good Wife or read Fifty Shades while you’re on the exercise bike or treadmill — just don’t forget to pedal or walk.

Working out with a group also helps many people. I’m not talking bootcamps or running groups. Check out your local Arthritis Foundation office – that’s where I found my hydrotherapy classes.

And, every once in a while, try something totally new: for one term I joined a Tai Chi for Arthritis group (again through Arthritis Victoria). Mix it up so you don’t get bored!

Excuse # 5: I Just Don’t Like to Move.

There are people who really DO NOT like moving but how about walking in a mall? Window shopping counts as walking!

If it’s sweating you don’t like, you can get a good workout without perspiring excessively: you can work out indoors, where it’s air conditioned; you can swim so you won’t notice any perspiration; or, try a low-sweat activity like yoga.

If exercise hurts your joints, try starting by exercising in water (my favourite – hydrotherapy!) The stronger your muscles get, the more they can support your joints, and the less you’ll hurt.

If you don’t like to move because you feel too fat, start with an activity that’s less public, like using an exercise video at home. Walk with nonjudgmental friends in your neighbourhood while wearing clothes that provide enough coverage that you feel comfortable.

Excuse # 6: I Always End up Quitting.

Set small, attainable goals – then you’re more likely to feel like a success, not a failure! If you exercise for five minutes a day for a week, you’ll feel good (maybe not immediately, but soon enough. I promise!)

Don’t try to increase your exercise by too great an amount each time. My rehab physio reminded me that Olympians try to increase their best by 5 per cent – so why work harder than an Olympian? If you do 5 minutes one day, try 6 minutes (okay, it’s actually 5.25 minutes, but really?) the next. I started at 10 minutes of walking and am now up to an hour by doing it this way – I only increased my times 4 times a week; the other 3 days, I walked for the same period of time as I had the day before.

It also helps to keep a log (especially as fibro fog can have us forgetting where we are up to). A log may help you see if you’re starting to fall off the wagon (or the treadmill).

Having an exercise buddy keeps you accountable as well – when you back out of a scheduled workout, you’re letting down your buddy as well as yourself.

And look toward the future. It’s harder to start than it is to stick with it once you’ve got your momentum going!

Any more excuses, people?

Other exercises you might like to try:

Fibro Friendly Exercises slideshow

The First Time

Many of us think we’re stuck: nothing is going to change, this is it, this is my life!

But why? There are still so many things we can do – and, for those of us stuck at home, perhaps a new opportunity to try something new.

It’s halfway through the year and here’s what I have done for the time:

18 January 2012 – Attended my first burlesque performance

2 February 2012 – Attended my first hydrotherapy class

27 February 2012 – Started my first Facebook page

6 March 2012 – Attended my first Bowen therapy treatment

13 March 2012 – Went to the Doggy beach for the first time

16 March 2012 – Wrote my first Blog post

28 March 2012 – Made my first video

1 April 2012 – Opened my first Cafepress store

4 April 2012 – Attended my first Pilates session

12 April 2012 – Attended my first Yoga session

18 April 2012 – Attended my first Tai Chi class

22 April 2012 – Z sleeps over for the first time

25 May 2012 – Produced my first cartoon character (FibroModem Girl)

1 June 2012 – Published my first newsletter

1 June 2012 – Attended my first Shaitsu treatment

7 June 2012 – Attended my first reflexology session

***NB – dates are from my own diary and may be incorrect as compared to blog posts.

Now I’m not trying to toot my own horn here – what I am trying to do is inspire you into trying something new. It can be absolutely anything – somewhere in all of that, I tried to make vegetable muffins for the first time – massive failure! So you could try baking, meditating, reading a new author, etc.

So tell me, when was the last time you did something new? And what was it?

Risk Free Tai Chi

I have previously told you about my experience with Tai Chi – I go to a modified class for Arthritis, held by the Arthritis Foundation. We practice a modified Sun tai chi, which has 12 forms (this info is just so you can understand the next part).

Clinical Rheumatology reported, on May 13 2012, that the Oregon Health & Science University’s Fibromyalgia Research Unit held a randomized controlled trial of 8-form Tai chi to gauge any improvement in symptoms and functional mobility in fibromyalgia patients.

Previous researchers have found that 10-form Tai chi yields symptomatic benefit in patients with FM. The purpose of this study was to further investigate earlier findings and add a focus on functional mobility.

Participants met in small groups twice weekly for 90 minutes over 12 weeks.

Of the 101 randomly assigned subjects, clinically and statistically significant improvements were seen in:

  • pain severity
  • pain interference
  • sleep, and
  • self-efficacy for pain control

No adverse events were noted.

Accordingly, the study reported that tai chi appears to be a safe and an acceptable exercise modality that may be useful as adjunctive therapy in the management of FM patients. Yippee! Tai chi class on Wednesday is still on!

Oh! What a Beautiful Morning!

The sun has come through those doggone clouds that have been here all week (and will return soon – Winter is coming!) The sky is blue. And I’m feeling exceptionally positive! (That could be because of the prednisolone, though, because all your warnings were correct and the ups and downs of this drug are berserk!) But everything is better when the sun is shining (except when it is too bright and causes my eyes and head to hurt – can’t I just be happy?)

Today I woke to marvellous comments on all my social media sites – it was almost like it was my birthday…but better – because I didn’t have to get a year older! The total and utter depletion of any energy from my body, that was yesterday, has been replaced with (some) buoyancy.

My Sickness Allowance came in so I was able to pay some money to my VISA. (I don’t even realise how much stress that puts on me until I press the PAY button and I can sigh with (some) relief.)

My wonderful Mommy and her cantankerous (yet loveable) partner, Henry, are going to ambush my previous rheumatologist. I have been waiting 7 weeks for him to complete a medical report so I can continue my appeal for Disability. I’m really glad I’m not going to be there – it will be really loud and embarrassing, but it should scare the shit out of him! There are appropriate times to cause a scene! This is one. If I don’t get that form returned in time, I will miss out on approximately $2000 in back pay. Go Henry!!!!

I am returning to the doctor, armed with all of your drug suggestions, to plot the next path in my course. I was thinking about it yesterday. I’ve decided I want a young, motivated doctor – some-one who is still positive and wants to be the best! some-one who wants to discover new things, who wants to be published, who is willing to experiment with new things! It seems that the older the doctor, the more jaded he has become! We need CHANGE THE WORLD doctors!

This evening, Mommy and I are going to our first BodyBalance class, which is supposed to be a fusion of tai-chi, yoga and pilates. Yay! some-one to come to classes with me! I’m looking forward to it – I can imagine Mommy and I giggling at the back of the room, like schoolgirls, falling and having to help each other up. You know I will let you all know how the class goes.

So, all-in-all, a great (actually, probably really normal – but it’s amazing what a positive attitude will get you) sounding day!

And, in case, you’ve been waiting with bated breath – here are some photos from Z’s party:

Slow Down – I Want to Get Off!

Once again, another blog author has made me have a think. I had to look at a previous post (Zoom! Zoom! Zoom! (Fibro Style)) to realise that I hadn’t quite covered the topic as well as I meant to; and as I sat crying in my Mommy’s car, after a one hour appointment with the rheumatologist, where we both begged for some sort of strategy or plan – not just to be told that this is it… – I felt like all I’m doing is rushing from one appointment to another, from one class to the next.

Yes, I had also been at the acupuncturist earlier in the day, followed by an appointment with the optometrist, where he flashed harsh lights into my eyes and then expected me to be able to read the stupid board! And yes, I was feeling a touch fragile; but this feeling was overwhelming – it’s all too much!

It shouldn’t be TOO much. I want to be able to go back to work. I want to run 100 files. I want to research. I want to have back-to back appointments. But, if I can’t handle a handful of classes in a week, how am I ever going to be able to return? And should I even want to put myself under so much stress?

Anyway, although I didn’t really feel like it at the time, the next day I went to my Tai Chi class. Concentrating on moving my hands, my feet and my breath does amazing things for clearing one’s mind.

The next week’s that is coming looks to be another busy one – can’t really put off some of the things that aren’t FM related. Life still goes on, right?

But, I gotta tell you, if I get anymore shit from Centrelink, I will probably lose it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Word Association

How cool is this!

This is a Word Cloud from Wordle. I discovered it by visiting Falling Out of the Fog. Wordle is a toy for generating word clouds from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. In this case, I put my blog through the toy.

It appears that I am great propounder of RELAXATION (although fibromyalgia is not that far behind). But do I practise what I preach?

Today was Tai Chi day – a relaxing hour of moving meditation. Then it was off to a new gym with my Mommy to find out about Body Balance classes – a holistic fitness program combining yoga, tai chi and Pilates. Mommy and I are going to try to go twice a week – and this is from a woman who doesn’t exercise. Although I think I can remember some Jane Fonda Beta videos back in the early 80s.

And now, here is where some relaxation techniques may have been useful…

On the way home, I called my rheumatologist, who has still not returned a finished medical report for my disability claim, for my weekly nag and reminder about this! (Don’t you think 8 weeks is long enough to fill in a form?)

Then, I received a phone call from Centrelink – supposedly I was no longer eligible for Sickness Allowance. What the HELL? Allegedly (oh, look! I’m still a lawyer!), information received from my employer made me no longer eligible. Supposedly I didn’t have a job to go back to – WHAT! I have an office there! I have 10 certificates framed and hanging on the wall there! I have business cards printed with that address! And, more importantly, I had spoken to my boss last week and everything was still okay. Anyway, the lady I was speaking to wasn’t permitted to give me any specific information about what had been said but she put me through (after a 20 minute hold time) to apply for a job seekers (incapacitated) payment application. This process was going to take at least 2 weeks – that’s 2 weeks without ANY money!

I made the appointment then got on the phone to my boss. After a quick discussion, I drafted a fax for him to sign and send to the original lady so that, hopefully, my eligibility will be reviewed and I can get paid. Quick(-ish) phone call back to that lady to make sure she knew that this (really important!) fax was coming through to her; then sit back and take a breath.

But NO! A phone call from my semi sister-in-law (my brother and her are living in sin!) about writing a legal-sounding letter to the supermarket, where two runaway trolleys had taken out the back of her car.

Then, some internet research about making an objection about misleading and deceptive conduct by Metricon (a building company in Australia) who, in my opinion (and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission agree!), are trying to charge my brother an extra $10 000.00, for something that was supposed to be included.

Finished? Not yet…Another phone call – this time to my medical insurance company. It should have been easy – all I wanted was to know how much money I would receive after ordering my contact lenses. Obviously, not such an easy question.

Big sigh! Gotta say that letting all that out is a great relaxation technique! I feel so much better!