No Life Without Water

Ever since I discovered the wonders of my warm water class, I have gone on and on and on  about the wonders of water.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALike all water exercises, water walking is easy on the joints. “The water’s buoyancy supports the body’s weight, which reduces stress on the joints and minimizes pain,” says Vennie Jones, aquatic coordinator for the Baylor Tom Landry Fitness Center in Dallas. “And it’s still a great workout. Water provides 12 times the resistance of air, so as you walk, you’re really strengthening and building muscle.” You do not bear weight while swimming and walking, however, so you’ll still need to add some bone-building workouts to your routine.

You can walk in either the shallow end of the pool or the deep end, using a flotation belt. The deeper the water, the more strenuous your workout. And it can be done in warm or cold water.

chris rock

Junction,_TX,_swimming_pool_IMG_4344What you need: A pool! That’s it – but for deep-water walking, a flotation belt keeps you upright and floating at about shoulder height.

How it works: You’ll stand about waist- to chest-deep in water, unless you’re deep-water walking. You walk through the water the same way you would on the ground. Try walking backward and sideways to tone other muscles.

Try it:  Stand upright, with shoulders back, chest lifted and arms bent slightly at your sides. Slowly stride forward, placing your whole foot on the bottom of the pool (instead of just your tiptoes), with your heel coming down first, then the ball of your foot. Avoid straining your back by keeping your core (stomach and back) muscles engaged as you walk.

water-walkingAdd intensity: Lifting your knees higher helps boost your workout. You also can do interval training – pumping arms and legs faster for a brief period, then returning to your normal pace, repeating the process several times.

Find a class: If you’re new to water exercises, an instructor can make sure your form is correct, says Jones. Plus, it can be fun to walk with others. To find a class near you, call your local YMCA, fitness centre or Arthritis Foundation office.

Don’t forget the water: You still need to drink water – even while exercising in the pool.

 

 

Sweet as Saccharine

I think that most of us have seen the Facebook post going around called Sweet Killer. I don’t know how much of the post is hyped up, but we do know that the (very) common excitotoxin called Aspartame is bad for us.

Excitotoxins are a necessary part of brain function – they get your neurons firing faster so that you can learn and process information quickly. They occur naturally in the brain. However, when you get too many of them in one area, they can over-simulate your neurons, cause multiple unpleasant symptoms, and even excite your brain cells to death.

Symptoms of high excitotoxin levels include:

  • mental misfires
  • amplified pain
  • uncontrollable anxiety and irritability

Sound familiar?

Now, back in March of last year, I gave up Pepsi Max. I didn’t really notice a difference except, having replaced Pepsi Max with flavoured mineral water, I gained more and more weight. (Have any of you noticed how many calories/kilojoules are in what I thought to be a healthier drink?)

logoSo, I decided I needed to do something about the extra weight. I pledged 30kgs to the Share the Weight campaign. DietRitePassionfruit1.25LWithout even thinking about it, I replaced the mineral water with a soda drink called Diet Rite – labelled 5% juice, low joule, natural colours, natural flavours and no added sugar. Sounds okay, right?

Well, today, I woke up with a headache which has been accompanying me everywhere (and getting worse) for about 4 weeks (anyone notice the date that I published Bigger is NOT Better!?) I don’t know what made me think about the soda but I did…finally.

Much as I hate it, it looks like I’ll be drinking water from now on!

P.S. MSG is another common excitotoxin.

 

Related Articles

There is No Life Without Water.

Ever since I discovered the wonders of my warm water class, I have gone on and on and on  about the wonders of water.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALike all water exercises, water walking is easy on the joints. “The water’s buoyancy supports the body’s weight, which reduces stress on the joints and minimizes pain,” says Vennie Jones, aquatic coordinator for the Baylor Tom Landry Fitness Center in Dallas. “And it’s still a great workout. Water provides 12 times the resistance of air, so as you walk, you’re really strengthening and building muscle.” You do not bear weight while swimming and walking, however, so you’ll still need to add some bone-building workouts to your routine.

You can walk in either the shallow end of the pool or the deep end, using a flotation belt. The deeper the water, the more strenuous your workout. And it can be done in warm or cold water.

chris rock

Junction,_TX,_swimming_pool_IMG_4344What you need: A pool! That’s it – but for deep-water walking, a flotation belt keeps you upright and floating at about shoulder height.

How it works: You’ll stand about waist- to chest-deep in water, unless you’re deep-water walking. You walk through the water the same way you would on the ground. Try walking backward and sideways to tone other muscles.

Try it:  Stand upright, with shoulders back, chest lifted and arms bent slightly at your sides. Slowly stride forward, placing your whole foot on the bottom of the pool (instead of just your tiptoes), with your heel coming down first, then the ball of your foot. Avoid straining your back by keeping your core (stomach and back) muscles engaged as you walk.

water-walkingAdd intensity: Lifting your knees higher helps boost your workout. You also can do interval training – pumping arms and legs faster for a brief period, then returning to your normal pace, repeating the process several times.

Find a class: If you’re new to water exercises, an instructor can make sure your form is correct, says Jones. Plus, it can be fun to walk with others. To find a class near you, call your local YMCA, fitness centre or Arthritis Foundation office.

Don’t forget the water: You still need to drink water – even while exercising in the pool.